Editorial

Five years after

|
(0)

EDITORIAL Here's the painful but undeniable truth: five years after a pair of airplanes flew into the Twin Towers in New York, killing almost 3,000 people, the world — and the United States — is a decidedly less secure place.
Sure, would-be terrorists can't carry box cutters (or toothpaste) onto planes anymore. It's harder to open cockpit doors. Some flights have fully armed undercover air marshals on board. Read more »

Veto the cable giveaway

|
(0)

Editor's note: This editorial has been corrected. An earlier version mischaracterized the effect of the cable bill on municipal finances.

EDITORIAL A terrible bill masquerading as a proconsumer law cleared both houses of the state legislature last week and is now on the governor's desk. Read more »

The cost of harassing the homeless

|
(0)

EDITORIAL Mayor Gavin Newsom, who has always talked about treating homeless people with compassion, is allowing the cops to do just the opposite — and it's costing the city millions. As Amanda Witherell reports on page 11, the San Francisco Police Department under the Newsom administration has issued 31,230 citations for so-called quality of life offenses like sleeping on the streets, sleeping in the parks, and panhandling. Read more »

Cutting taxes the right way

|
(0)

EDITORIAL Finally the Democratic Party in California is starting to talk seriously about tax policy. It's an important change in the political winds, and if state treasurer Phil Angelides can get beyond the tepid-to-hostile press and use his promise of a middle-class tax cut to gain ground on Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, it may signal the end of decades of regressive and deeply harmful economic policy.
Schwarzenegger, who knows he's in a tough race, has been trying to smear Angelides by saying that the Democratic candidate is pushing for tax hikes. Read more »

Cops out of their cars

|
(0)

EDITORIAL The politics of crime can be tricky for the left: progressives are against far-reaching and punitive crackdowns, against police abuse, against the pervasive financial waste in law enforcement ... and sometimes can't come up with answers when neighborhoods like Hunters Point and the Western Addition ask what local government is going to do to stop waves of violence like the homicide epidemic plaguing San Francisco today.
So it's encouraging to see Sup. Read more »

Public power returns

|
(0)

EDITORIAL Just when it looked like the public power movement had stalled, along comes the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission with a surprise announcement that it will create a public power demonstration project in the most appropriate part of town and reinvigorate efforts to kick Pacific Gas and Electric out of the city.
The agency has tentatively cut a deal to provide power directly to the 1,600 housing units and businesses that Lennar Homes is about to start building on Parcel A of the Hunters Point Naval Shipyard — bringing clean, green (it comes from city hydroelectric and solar pro Read more »

Don't call the feds

|
(0)

EDITORIAL It's bad enough that the federal government is aggressively infringing on the rights of three Bay Area journalists, the sovereignty of California, and the freedom of San Franciscans to choose — through the elections of our district attorney, sheriff, and mayor — how laws should be enforced in this city. Read more »

Vote to impeach

|
(0)

EDITORIAL Mainstream media reporters and pundits, as well as our cynical colleagues at the SF Weekly and the rest of their corporate alt-weekly chain, love to bash the San Francisco Board of Supervisors and the city councils of other Bay Area cities for passing resolutions on big questions like war, human rights, or impeachment.
We don't share that view. Read more »

Can Werbach reform Wal-Mart?

|
(0)

EDITORIAL Those with power rarely use it to help the powerless: workers, foreigners, or the planet. That's why we're fascinated by the green noises that we're starting to hear from übercorporation Wal-Mart and with its decision to hire our hometown environmental heavy hitter Adam Werbach, a move that reporter Amanda Witherell explores in this week's cover story (see "An Unbelievable Truth," page 15).
We're skeptical of Wal-Mart's motives and commitment to putting the planet before profits, so we truly hope that Werbach hasn't been co-opted into a greenwashing effort. Read more »

How to fix the sewers

|
(0)

EDITORIAL Every time it rains heavily in San Francisco, millions of gallons of barely treated sewage flow into the bay. Read more »