Trash

13 and life

Ki-ki-ki, ma-ma-ma ... Jason's back at Camp Crystal Lake
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HORROR CLASSIC The scene: Camp Crystal Lake, 1958. The song: "Michael, Row the Boat Ashore." As a full moon looms overhead, someone sinister enough to get their own POV shot creeps into a cabin where two fresh-faced counselors are groping each other with wanton glee. "We weren't doin' anything!" the boy protests. Too late, sucka! With a scream, a freeze-frame, and a title card that zooms forward so fast it apparently shatters the camera lens, Sean S. Cunningham's Friday the 13th begins. Read more »

Yuks galore

Another Hole in the Head horrorfest explodes at the Roxie
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FILM FESTIVAL Sometimes the best thing a movie has going for it is its title, especially if that title happens to be Mutant Vampire Zombies from the 'Hood!. Far and away the most expressively named selection at this year's Another Hole in the Head Film Festival, Zombies imagines what would happen if a couple of rival gangbangers, a weary cop, and assorted other ragtag types emerged as the only humans unaffected by a mysterious solar flare. Read more »

I against I

Can Hieronymus Merkin Ever Forget Mercy Humppe and Find True Happiness?
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CULT FILM Nothing exerts quite the same simultaneous attraction-repulsion magnetism like a really world-class vanity project. Read more »

Go Daddy-o

Cinematic ass-kickin' runs in the Thrillsville family
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CULT FILM STAR Veteran actor Robert Viharo apparently doesn't like talking about the shlockier stuff in his résumé. Read more »

Children of the (pop)corn

Strap yourself in for the summer movie blitz
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Must be summer — every movie I want to see in the next three months is either a sequel, a superhero movie, or a superhero movie sequel. Granted, I'm girly enough to want to see Sex and the City (May 30), snarky enough to eagerly anticipate M. Night Shyamalan's The Happening (June 13), and arty enough to get excited about Werner Herzog's Antarctica doc Encounters at the End of the World (June 27). Read more »

Alligators, man

Green, mean, and in the movies
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TOOTHY CINEMA Alligators, man. As James Bond, Indiana Jones, and Peter Pan will tell you, meeting a gator is a surefire way to add insta-peril to your script, or at least supply a pun-tastic one-liner (Arnold Schwarzenegger to recently expired gator in 1996's Eraser: "You're luggage!") Last year's pseudo-political Primeval was a disappointment, and Rogue, Aussie director Greg Mclean's follow-up to Wolf Creek (1995), never quite made it into theaters stateside. Read more »

Battle scarred

Has Battlestar Galactica jumped the shark?
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kimberly@sfbg.com

TV, I: Battlestar Galactica — what the frak happened? But let's back that Viper up: as a drooling, antsy constituent of the 12 colonies, a.k.a., a total BSG dweeb, I have to confess that I'm filled with both moist-eyed, fangirl anticipation and been-burned, skeptical trepidation, awaiting the Peabody- and Emmy–winning series's final, fourth season, which starts April 4 on the Sci-Fi channel. Read more »

Ace invader

Ace Frehley speaks!
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GUITAR HERO Here's a star-spangled way to start a conversation: "Hi, Ace Frehley calling!" The 51-year-old Frehley, a.k.a. KISS's guitar-slinging "Space Ace," telephoned me from his Westchester, N.Y. studio to discuss his current tour — which kicked off Feb. Read more »

Martial bliss

Flash Point's Donnie Yen shoots back
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TAKE ACTION Hey, Donnie Yen fans! Director Wilson Yip's Flash Point — in which the charismatic martial arts star (2002's Hero, 1993's Iron Monkey) plays an aggro cop on gangster-beatdown detail — is actually getting a local theatrical release. Currently, Yen is in Shanghai shooting Yip Man, which he describes as "the story of Bruce Lee's teacher, a master of the Wing Chun kung fu style." He's a busy guy, and he could probably flatten any fool with a flick of his pinky finger. Read more »

Saint Peter

Bogdanovich gets his due in a Castro Theatre tribute
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› a&e@sfbg.com

Arguably no modern film director made a better sustained entrance than Peter Bogdanovich, whose first four features were all triumphs. Targets (1968) was a chilling conceit that brought Hollywood pretend terror (Boris Karloff basically playing himself) against a modern real-world horror, the randomly mass-murdering sniper. That critical success led to a major studio deal to adapt (with then wife and collaborator Polly Platt) Larry McMurtry's novel The Last Picture Show (1971), a melancholy black-and-white flashback to 1950s rural Texas. Read more »