Theater

Good grief

Julie Marie Myatt recasts 1970s nostalgia for our own bleak times in 'The Happy Ones'

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arts@sfbg.com

THEATER "Oh, this stupid war. I don't know who to blame anymore, do you?"

So asks aging American divorcée Mary-Ellen (Marcia Pizzo), in 1975 Southern California, of Vietnamese war refugee Bao (Jomar Tagatac), who has lost his entire family back home. It's a fraught question that, maybe fittingly, receives no answer. But it's made all the more complicated and troubling in the Magic Theatre production of Julie Marie Myatt's 2009 comedy-drama, The Happy Ones.Read more »

Fallacis and fallacies

Lawrence Wright's new play falls flat at Berkeley Rep

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THEATER Speaking of oneself in the third person is a thing few figures outside of fiction can really pull off. Tarzan and Yoda, fine. Oriana Fallaci — well, in journalist-playwright Lawrence Wright's new two-hander, Fallaci, you could be forgiven for thinking the title character is not that real either.Read more »

Triggers

George F. Walker's caustic comedy 'Dead Metaphor' brings it all back home

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Angels in Budapest

Hungary's premier stage offers a striking revival of Tony Kushner's groundbreaking play

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arts@sfbg.com

THEATER On two old VHS tapes in the collection of San Francisco's Museum of Performance and Design you can watch the Eureka Theater's 1991 world premiere of Tony Kushner's Angels in America, a response to the AIDS epidemic and the reactionary politics of the Reagan era. It's a low-fi document, with poor sound quality, but it's completely riveting. Something more than the play's words and images, as striking as they are, cling to that worn magnetic tape: there's the electric excitement of a work of art cracking open its historical moment.Read more »

Sort of and last

The Wooster Group and New York City Players make a long overdue Bay Area appearance

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THEATER In a deceptively low-key but major theatrical event, Yerba Buena Center for the Arts last weekend presented the local debuts of both the Wooster Group and the New York City Players, in their collaborative take on three of Eugene O'Neill's seafaring "Glencairn plays."Read more »

Missing person

'Se Llama Cristina' offers a sentimental story beneath a gritty exterior

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arts@sfbg.com

THEATER A filthy, forlorn world emerges in surreal half-light at the outset of Magic Theater's premiere of Se Llama Cristina, the new play by celebrated San Francisco–based playwright Octavio Solis. But almost as quickly, its initially intriguing outlines begin to look artificial, becoming the bloated lines of caricature more than a poetical evocation of real life, as the sentiment at the heart of this sometimes forceful but finally thin and frustrating play steadily takes over.Read more »

Festival of festivals

Some highlights from New York's APAP-pourri

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arts@sfbg.com

THEATER The chill air had no snow in it. Instead, a particularly nasty outbreak of influenza whipped through the city, leaving a fine coating of mucus on the ground. Still, New York City looked beautiful as the various performing arts festivals that cluster around the annual meeting of APAP (the Association of Performing Arts Presenters) all revved up for a fat two weeks of shows this January.Read more »

London diary

Cruising to the end of story, and Forced Entertainment's 'The Coming Storm'
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arts@sfbg.com

THEATER Tom Cruise, clad in military drag, descended last week by RAF helicopter into Trafalgar Square in what is best described as forced entertainment but was in fact a time-wasting scene from his upcoming blockbuster All You Need Is Kill. Not quite simultaneously but with considerably more stealth, I advanced into South London's Battersea area, in a completely uncoordinated foray, to see the latest from famed Sheffield-based pomo theater artists Forced Entertainment.Read more »

GOLDIES 2012: Anna Ishida

A a chameleon-like quality and versatile vocals that make her so compelling to watch on stage.

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GOLDIES One of the very first things you'll notice about Anna Ishida, onstage and off, is an aura of self-possession that simultaneously grounds her and yet sets her ever-so-subtly apart in a crowd. But she also has a chameleon-like quality, a way of blending seamlessly into her surroundings, whether it's a 49-seat black box theater on Natoma Street, or the hip buzz of Farley's East in Oakland, where we meet over coffee and sandwiches.Read more »

Intimate company

Cutting Ball's Ghost Sonata stalks the stage as the opening gambit of its Strindberg Cycle

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