Theater

GOLDIES 2010: Christopher Kuckenbaker

Bringing graceful work and alternately intense and quirky looks to the stage

|
()

In September, the San Francisco Fringe Festival offered patrons an off-Beat gem, The Burroughs and Kookie Show. A deftly performed blend of homage and intimate psychic excavation, the play imagines William S. Burroughs (actor-playwright Christopher Kuckenbaker) as talk show host, opposite a deadpan, laconic musician named Loubis the Pubis (Louis Libert), and a missing cohost, "Kookie," symbolized in absentia by a small, empty chair. Tonight's guest? An unsuspecting actor named Chris Baker (Christopher Kuckenbaker again). Read more »

Now is the time

African-American Shakespeare Company meets the future with a re-visioned classic

|
()

Expansive roles

The Brothers Size gets apt Magic, while the play's the thing in Etiquette

|
()

"Red" bayou

Marin Theatre enlivens the first entry in Tarell Alvin McCraney's Brother/Sister trilogy

|
()

STAGE The young woman has something wrong with her; a chorus of women tell us so. They're neighbors in the same particular, yet nebulous, time/place: a housing project in a nameless small town in the Louisiana bayou, some time in the "distant present." As if floating on water, the young woman, an African American teen named Oya (Lakisha May), lies prone on a dais at the center of an otherwise bare stage as they speak of her. Read more »

Mr. In-Between

John Fisher's adaptation of The Picture of Dorian Gray casts bright light on murky morals

|
()

The final act

FALL ARTS: Bay Area stages cover the gulf and cruise the outer limits this fall
|
()

New and improv-ed

San Francisco Improv Festival returns to link past and future

|
()

The launching of the San Francisco Improv Festival, back in 2004, signaled a major resurgence for improvisational theater in the Bay Area, long dominated by the exceptional BATS (Bay Area Theatre Sports) and related groups, but recently joined by a host of newer outfits as well. The rollicking festival attracted eager audiences, while bringing together a somewhat disparate local and intergenerational community of improvisers with national and even international acts. Read more »

Put on a happy face

Paul Rudnick's tonics for gay solemnity lack fizz at New Conservatory

|
()

arts@sfbg.com

THEATER Twenty-first-century post-9/11 gay America doesn't get a makeover in Paul Rudnick's new collection of short plays, it goes out for one. Rudnick (The Most Fabulous Story Ever Told; Valhalla) surveys the state of the gay nation through four small, broadly comical vignettes in three far-flung American locales — all slouching toward Manhattan — and finds it taking itself and everything else far too seriously. Read more »

Deep red bells

Crowded Fire premieres Enrique Urueta's "psycho-Southern queer country dance tragedy"

|
()

A few months ago, Impact Theater premiered Enrique Urueta's Learn to Be Latina, a raucous satire of market-driven multiculturalism that pivoted on the ethnic dos-and-don'ts of the music industry. That production only partly prepares one for Crowded Fire's premiere of the Bay Area playwright's latest effort, Forever Never Comes. Read more »

Sexy, seedy, comical

Capitalism is a wild ride in The Apotheosis of Pig Husbandry
|
()