Theater

Biting the Big Apple

Bay Area performers storm the New York Fringe Festival

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arts@sfbg.com THEATER The world's largest arts festival, the now-venerable Edinburgh Festival Fringe, got its start in 1946 as a scrappy party-crasher outside the official Edinburgh International Festival. Thanks to its inspired blend of difficult-to-categorize, anything-goes performances, the Edinburgh Fringe helped create a definitive theatrical format that has since flourished in Fringe Festivals around the world. Among other things, Fringe is a catalyst for new works, new companies, and new interpretations of how theater can be made, and experienced.Read more »

Don't go changin'

Kafka's The Metamorphosis discovers itself transformed into a play

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Return to Barbary Lane

New musical Tales of the City debuts (where else?) in San Francisco -- and nostalgia reigns supreme

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Stalled out

Campo Santo takes Denis Johnson's Nobody Move for a spin that never leaves the driveway

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THEATER Call it one step back in the middle of a big leap forward. Intersection for the Arts and resident theater company Campo Santo marks the organization's recent move to the Chronicle Building with a hobbled world premiere adaptation of Denis Johnson's latest novel, Nobody Move. The title for Johnson's fleet, cool, and witty crime noir comes from a reggae lyric: "Nobody move, nobody get hurt." A cautionary line that sounds too prescient under the circumstances, but life moves whether we like it or not.Read more »

Stein time

David Greenspan presents Gertrude Stein's Plays

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Hot house Magic

Taylor Mac's The Lily's Revenge lights up Magic Theatre with earthy flower power

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THEATER Talk about community theater. New York City drag artist Taylor Mac doesn't just bring his Obie Award–winning 2009 show to town, but a good swath of the town to the show. That includes six local directors and something like 40 local actors and musicians, with host Magic Theatre producing in collaboration with queer performance collective THEOFFCENTER and a large handful of other Bay Area players (Climate Theater, Crowded Fire, elastic future, Erika Chong Shuch Performance Project, Shotgun Players, and TheatreWorks).Read more »

Age against the Machine

Geoff Hoyle's Geezer lives!

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THEATER Death-defying acts of autobiography enliven the main stage at the Marsh this week in Geoff Hoyle's unadorned yet dazzling new solo show. Developed with director David Ford — and one of the very best things to come from the Marsh's fertile performance breeding grounds all year if not longer — Geezer takes a serpentine course through the accomplished career of the longtime Bay Area actor and physical comedian to confront the challenges, epiphanies, and qualified, but nonetheless quality, opportunities of aging and mortality.Read more »

Found in translation

From ancient Greek to modern French, Bay Area theatre explores the possibilities of translation

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Those who know nothing of foreign languages know nothing of their own.

— GoetheRead more »

Harmonic canons

Schick Machine hits the right notes, while Lady Grey is upstaged

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THEATER A gorgeous clutter of instruments fills the stage at Z Space/Theater Artaud this week, and audiences, after an eye- and earful of Schick Machine, are invited to go up and play them, too. A musical background is unnecessary: Nothing on stage likely resembles anything you grew up practicing, and anyway all that's called for is a little rhythm. The show itself gives you a healthy dose, amid a wonderfully designed, gently madcap, almost cosmological musing on the nature and origins of rhythm as well as our yearning embrace of it (and vice versa).Read more »

Mother courage

Lynn Nottage's Ruined finds life amid atrocity in the Congo

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arts@sfbg.com

STAGE As outrage mounts at the vicious repression of civilians in Libya, Lynn Nottage's 2009 Pulitzer Prize-winning play Ruined reminds us of the ongoing crimes against humanity — in particular the strategic use of sexual violence against women — carried out routinely for years in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The devastating civil war that began there in 1998 continues today as one of the most destructive on the planet, having taken well more than 5 million lives.Read more »