Stage

Grade A

THE QUEER ISSUE: Fresh Meat serves up a diverse evening of performance
|
(0)

a&eletters@sfbg.com

It was a gathering of tribes with more tattoos and partially shaved heads per square foot than anywhere else in San Francisco. The sartorial imagination at times rivaled the one on stage. In other words, it was the eighth Fresh Meat Festival, celebrating transgender and queer performance, and Project Artaud Theater packed them in.

Announced as the largest festival of its kind in the country, Fresh Meat is the brain- (and heart-) child of Sean Dorsey. Read more »

Shake, shimmy, subvert

THE QUEER ISSUE: Queer burlesque -- especially of the local variety -- lets it all hang out
|
(0)

molly@sfbg.com

The tradition of burlesque has always been about subverting the norm and challenging the privileged class. So it should be no surprise that queer performers make up a significant percentage of the new burlesque movement. Or, as Amelia Mae Paradise, cofounder of the queer femme burlesque troupe Diamond Daggers, puts it: "The burlesque world has always had room for freaks and queers and fat ladies."

A quick look at the current Bay Area burlesque scene confirms Paradise's theory. Read more »

Going postal

Magic Theatre delivers a winning stamp-collecting caper with Mauritius
|
(0)

a&eletters@sfbg.com

The ins and outs of stamp collecting can strike an outside ear as so much esoteric jabbering about phosphor bands and dandy rolls. Read more »

First things Faust

Shotgun Players' Faust, Part 1 at the Ashby Stage is whole unto itself
|
(0)

a&eletters@sfbg.com

Bay Area writer-director Mark Jackson has been rightly hailed for his original scripts, especially since the rollicking ingenuity of 2003's The Death of Meyerhold. But his dialogue with established or classic plays has been just as intriguing to follow. Here, strict fidelity to the text has not always proved a recipe for success. Read more »

Revenge of the nerds

High-energy Fukú Americanus lacks depth
|
(0)

a&eletters@sfbg.com

"Fukú Americanus" does not actually translate as "fucked-up American," but it might as well. Fukú refers to a curse, a bad piece of destiny that clings to your behind like a genetically transmitted boot up the ass, passing on through generations until it runs its course, which is who-knows-how-long. Read more »

The world stage

The San Francisco International Arts Festival's globo-theatrical must-sees
|
(0)

a&eletters@sfbg.com

Recently I was lucky enough to land at an international theater festival in Wroclaw, Poland, jostling elbows with a transnational mix of theater folk on the occasion of the 13th annual European Theatre Prize, this year awarded to the great Polish director Krystian Lupa. It was an eye-opening glimpse at some awesome theatrical muscle rarely if ever seen in the Bay Area, or even the United States. Read more »

On the rise

The Best of PlayGround Festival, now more than a decade old, nurtures exciting, emerging talent
|
(0)

a&eletters@sfbg.com

Even when times are shaky in San Francisco, it's a fine time to head to PlayGround. Read more »

Fit to print?

The Story's black-and-white news unfolds in the audience's reactions
|
(0)

a&eletters@sfbg.com

Not long ago, before newspapers themselves were an endangered species, survival among journalists at the country's leading papers was already a Darwinian proposition, especially for people of color. Read more »

El Paso passages

Poetic Lydia follows a family in transition -- and delves into sheer lyricism
|
(0)

a&eletters@sfbg.com

At the poetic heart of acclaimed playwright Octavio Solis's aching, wild, and poignant new drama, Lydia — receiving a beautifully cast and memorable West Coast premiere at Marin Theatre Company under the direction of MTC's Jasson Minadakis — is a mysterious connection between two very differently challenged and empowered young women: the severely brain-damaged Ceci Flores (Gloria Garayua) and her family's new undocumented Mexican maid, Lydia (Adriana Gaviria). Read more »

Sam I am?

Charlie Varon examines Jewish identity in the 21st century in Rabbi Sam
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

He has come, he says, to take American Jewry into the 21st century. Some members of the suburban synagogue that just hired Sam Isaac, charismatic tax attorney and single father turned rabble-rousing rabbi and spiritual visionary, are thrilled. Others, not so much. Between those two poles, and across 12 fully fledged characters, solo performer extraordinaire Charlie Varon takes us on a steadily dramatic, extremely witty, and thought-provoking ride through what he pictures as a transformative moment in Jewish identity. Read more »