Stage

Imagine there's no heaven

The SF Mime Troupe's GodFellas is hella well timed
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A constitutional amendment mandating a national day of prayer? If such a proposal remains fictitious (for the moment), it hardly stretches the imagination. Read more »

Explosive

Crowded Fire's Hands torch neoliberalism
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China, the burgeoning frontier of unfettered capitalism these days, naturally gives rise to much scholarly and popular commentary as one market follows another. Read more »

It's a small world after all

Lengthy Babylon Heights stumbles off the Yellow Brick Road
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Are you a good dwarf or a bad dwarf? In the storied production history of The Wizard of Oz, there were notoriously (and no doubt, apocryphally) so few of the former that Glinda-like attempts at taxonomy seem pointless. They were all bad, or at least naughty, as dwarves have historically seemed in the popular imagination. Read more »

Goode is great ...

... despite an uneven 20th anniversary concert
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Passion plays

Powerful writers and equally intense actors play a vital part in Campo Santo's success, 10 years on
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Campo Santo is currently celebrating its 10th anniversary, a significant milestone for any small theater company. But this one really does have something to celebrate. Read more »

Multi-angle magic

Margaret Jenkins Dance Company gets kaleidoscopic with A Slipping Glimpse
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"Dance/Screen: Innovative International Dance Films"

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PREVIEW Dance on film looks flat, distorted, and without nuances, right? Yes and no. In general, dance does not take kindly to the screen. Good enough for documenting or teaching, films simply don't convey the effervescent presence of a live performance. But in some cases the medium goes beyond simply recording and actually partners with the choreography in a way that can be every bit as exciting as a live performance. As a genre, dance films are fairly new and, often, still don't get no respect. Read more »

Bitter wounds

The eloquent Devil on All Sides searches for life during wartime
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Youthful innocence and stupidity can generally be relied on in making soldiers and war; those lacking such qualities may have to be beaten and intimidated into service. The process inspires some vivid imagery in French playwright Fabrice Melquiot's The Devil on All Sides (Le Diable en Partage), a poetical mix of fantasy and harsh reality set amid the 199295 Bosnian war. Read more »

Double digits

Caryl Churchill's creepy A Number loses some of its complexity at ACT
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Bernard is a chip off the old block. "You're just what I wanted," his father, Salter, assures him. Made to order, in fact. Now a grown man, Bernard (Josh Charles) confronts his father (Bill Smitrovich) with an unsettling discovery: He's the clone of a previously undisclosed original, a replacement for the beautiful child Salter once had but, apparently, lost. At first it's hard to say how Salter's story keeps changing. Read more »

Devil times four

Campo Santo sends some noteworthy notes to Satan in Haze
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Campo Santo's Haze slips comfortably into the 10th anniversary season of a company that's built its rep (repertoire and reputation) on close collaborations with leading American fiction writers. This lean, shrewd, and forceful staging of stories by Junot Diaz, Dave Eggers, Denis Johnson, and Vendela Vida turns a literary buffet into a raw and atmospheric performance piece. Read more »