Music Features

Purple reign

G-Stack and V-White of East Oakland's Delinquents drop some very unhyphy solo projects as they contemplate a final album together
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I first heard the Delinquents in 1999, when "That Man!" was in heavy rotation on KMEL. Its subject matter — caring for the kids while the wifey's out cheating — was unique in gangsta rap. "We came from the left with that," G-Stack says, yet the freshness of the concept, combined with a funky Mike D beat and memorable Harm hook, made it an instant classic. Read more »

Axis power

Japanese kraut rock? Fujiya & Miyagi really aren't either
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It has been noted in the mostly laudatory press surrounding their collection of 10-inch EPs, Transparent Things (Tirk/Word and Sound), that Fujiya & Miyagi aren't Japanese. Nor are they a duo. Read more »

Pop goes Panther

A hip-spasming dose of damaged soul
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Prince may have his devoted popites canonizing those purple-clad jewels once again after his recent Super Bowl halftime performance, but in Portland, Ore., there's an equally crude one-man dance-aster who could soon take the crown from His Royal Badass. This beat blaster and master, however, comes in the form of a scrawny gyrator whose elasticlike body rapidly contorts, recoils, and slams against walls during his pop-flushed freak-outs.

Since 2002, Panther, a.k.a. Read more »

Frosty love

Have some coke and a frown with The Clipse
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By Johnny Ray Huston

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First things first: even if there's been a Michael Mann remake of Miami Vice between the day that Pusha T and Malice first rhymed about Tubbs and Crockett and now, Clipse's Hell Hath No Fury (Re Up Gang/Star Trak, 2006) also hath no shortage of extraordinary future-sounds. Read more »

Noisepop cracks up: trading jibes with Patton Oswalt

Plus more NoisePop picks
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Our little bundle of noise is almost all grown up. Damning the brooding tradition of adolescence, Noise Pop has learned to laugh at itself — and anything that involves swigging beer and heckling Patton Oswalt without a two-drink minimum sounds like pure fucking genius to me. I recently spoke to Oswalt on the phone from Burbank. After soaking in enough indie to keep you cloaked in scene points until next year, you may want to check out his act alongside fellow comedians Brian Posehn and Marian Bamford. (K. Read more »

New mutants

Surrender to the psych-noise assaults of Eats Tapes
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A-ha. Baltimora. Missing Persons. Those bands probably have an emblematic significance to any Brat Pack–emuutf8g, spring break–starved teenager affiliated with the MTV generation of the 1980s. But as the '90s beckoned, feathered hair and talking cars gave way to the Urkel and Mentos commercials, and all the while, another compulsion began to render our motor skills useless. Only this one came in the form of a heather gray plastic box, and its mascot was a mustachioed plumber with a Brooklyn accent. Read more »

Raising the BARR

The life and times of multitasking multimedia maven Brendan Fowler
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"I haven't lived anywhere since April for more than 12 days." Brendan Fowler tells me this on the phone from New York, where he's dug in to prepare for a national tour — his first with a live band — supporting BARR's new album, Summary (5 Rue Christine). He's a little out of breath from racing up apartment stairs while hyping the band ("I think it's going to be bananas. I totally started crying the other day when we were playing songs for the first time. Read more »

Feeling the spirit

Ghostland Observatory want to rock your body
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Yeah, I was a club kid once. It's a bit of a blur, but somehow somewhere in the '90s I went from punk and indie to baggy pants and glow sticks in the flick of a switch. I put away my Fall records and picked up endless white-label 12-inches and compilation CDs with titles like Ultimate Techno Explosion. Or something to that effect. Like I said, it's a blur. I remember the dancing, though — suddenly my punk ass liked to shake! It's a shame most of my indie friends chose to stay behind, but this was the '90s. Read more »

Noise Pop: Revisiting the Clinic

Clinic returns to form
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Liking a band for more than three albums is getting harder these days, as many fall apart by that point. Even when groups do make it, most stop being musically interesting or otherwise start sucking. Clinic almost did that: Their third album, Winchester Cathedral (Domino, 2004), wasn't bad but didn't find the band progressing. Their distorted Farfisa started to sound routine and cliché; their trance-inducing rhythms begat yawning.

Clinic's recently released full-length, Visitations (Domino), finds the Liverpool quartet back in form. Read more »

Noise Pop: Basking in their luster

Or harshing their mellow? Brightblack Morning Light
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Oh me, oh my, love that country pie, and oh me, oh my, the influence of Devendra Banhart and Will Oldham is now as long and thick as their beards. Actually, Brightblack Morning Light's Nathan Shineywater and Rachael Hughes were opening for Oldham when Banhart was making the leap from homemade cassette to Young God. Read more »