Film Review

Mexico City, mi amor

Julián Hernández charts a broken sky — and the streets below it
|
()

johnny@sfbg.com
If you live in the city and you've been blessed, you've had the experience of meeting a lover on a favorite street corner, in an open square, or by a favorite vista or shadowy and partially hidden place. The opening scenes of Julián Hernández's Broken Sky tap precisely into this hide-and-seek game for grown-ups — and the heightened expectations and disappointments it can create. Plaintive college student Gerardo (Miguel Ángel Hoppe) has the rare type of exaggeratedly masculine-feminine features — eyes wide and almost crossed — that are made for melodrama. Read more »

Fast Food Nation

Spit on your burger's the least of your worries
|
()

Book lovers always lament movie adaptations: they rarely deliver. But Fast Food Nation, like a swift injection of growth hormone, adds flesh and character to the very real problems of where America's food comes from and the different ways it's absolutely mishandled. Read more »

For Your Consideration

For your critical devastation
|
()

People like Christopher Guest's improv-based comedies — This Is Spinal Tap, Waiting for Guffman, Best in Show, A Mighty Wind — in a peculiarly self-satisfied way, confident that enjoying them means they’re in on a sophisticated joke that the ordinary Adam Sandler–liking rabble don’t get. Yet for all their small joys, Guest's films make me wish they had big ones — bigger laughs, sharper satire, more narrative drive. The actors automatically raise a smile because we've loved them so many times before. But are they the best judges of their material? Read more »

Goodbye PG

The educational documentaries you can't take your kids to see
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com
When Japanese documentary filmmaker Kazuo Hara was approached by Okuzaki Kenzo — the subject of his 1987 The Emperor's Naked Army Marches On — and asked to film him committing murder, Hara strongly considered it before turning him down, more than anything because he "had become really sick of Okuzaki." Or so he told an interviewer. This sounds like bullshit, and it may be, but the filming approaches and content of Hara's body of work make you think that maybe he could have done it. Read more »

Grey Gardens: The Original

The staunchest of the staunch
|
()

Staunch characters — S-T-A-U-N-C-H. That description applies to Grey Gardens devotees, who've found their unwavering dedication and commitment rewarded with a new Albert Maysles movie about the Edith Bouvier Beales. Still, another look at the original 1975 Grey Gardens will probably always be the best way to honor and commune with Big Edie and Little Edie — if ever a classic rewarded repeat viewings, it's this one. All the Maysles brothers (Albert and the now-deceased David) had to do was bring the film. Read more »

Goldies Film winner James T. Hong

|
()

It's rare when a filmmaker is able to match provocative themes with evocative imagery — and do it consistently. Addressing race and class issues in his arrestingly photographed works, James T. Hong is one such artist. His filmography includes Behold the Asian: How One Becomes What One Is (which won a Golden Gate Award at the 2000 San Francisco International Film Festival despite its labeling of dot-com-era San Francisco as "the white asshole paradise") and Taipei 101: A Travelogue of Symptoms (Sensitive Version), an excoriation of white guy–Asian girl couples. Read more »

Goldies Film winners Chris Metzler and Jeff Springer

|
()

Like the steadfast Salton Sea itself, Chris Metzler and Jeff Springer's Plagues and Pleasures on the Salton Sea has displayed remarkable staying power. The first version of the film played at the 2004 San Francisco Documentary Film Festival, one of more than 100 festivals that have screened the doc since its initial release. Read more »

30 years and one minute: Film Arts Foundation

|
()

The Film Arts Foundation turns 30 this year, and to celebrate it's throwing a party at the Castro Theatre. One-minute movies are a major element of the FAF's birthday bash — 60-second efforts by some of the organization's filmmaking members will be shown as part of an evening program MCed by Peter Coyote and Nancy Kelly. Read more »

Embedded: A Q&A with Iraq in Fragments director James Longley

|
()

It only takes a few minutes of watching Iraq in Fragments to recognize that the film stands apart from the Iraqumentary pack: dazzling cinematography in place of the dull visuals of the evening news, slice-of-life narration instead of talking heads. Divided into three sections, director James Longley's reportage shows us the everyday chaos in Baghdad and beyond with dramatic vividness — a vividness that, if nothing else, makes us realize how degraded most of the imagery we receive from Iraq is at the moment. Read more »

Oh, Alejandro

Babel goes ambulance chasing across the globe
|
()

› a&eletters@sfbg.com
These days finesse in the art of montage is too often used to compensate for ineptitude (or just laziness) in the art of storytelling. Of course, rhythmic, Eisensteinian montage can be beautiful in itself and can even bear the weight of actual substance. Read more »