Film Review

Short takes: SFIFF week two

Prince Avalanche, Computer Chess, The Strange Little Cat, Waxworks, Invasion of the Body Snatchers, and more picks from the huge fest

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Prince Avalanche (David Gordon Green, US, 2012) It has been somewhat hard to connect the dots between David Gordon Green the abstract-narrative indie poet (2000's George Washington, 2003's All the Real Girls) and DGG the mainstream Hollywood comedy director (2008's Pineapple Express, yay; 2011's Your Highness and The Sitter, nay nay nay). But here he brings those seemingly irreconcilable personas together, and they make very sweet music indeed. Read more »

Short takes: SFIFF week one

You're Next, Rosie, The Kill Team, The Patience Stone, and more reviews of film fest features

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SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL

April 25-May 9, most shows $10-15

Various venues

festival.sffs.orgRead more »

Stop making sense

'Upstream Color' is a head-scratcher — but it's worth it

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM A woman, a man, a pig, a worm, Walden — what? If you enter into Shane Carruth's Upstream Color expecting things like a linear plot, exposition, and character development, you will exit baffled and distressed. Best to understand in advance that these elements are not part of Carruth's master plan. In fact, based on my own experiences watching the film twice, I'm fairly certain that not really understanding what's going on in Upstream Color is part of its loopy allure.Read more »

Rambling man

Terrence Malick's Hollywood revival sours with 'To the Wonder'

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Alternative medicine

Got Hollywood fatigue? Seek out 'Starbuck' and 'The Silence'

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM No country exports mainstream films to the extensive success that the US does. To the frequent chagrin of local filmmakers and cultural watchdogs, Hollywood dominates many nations' box offices, non-English-speaking ones included. Nor do we reciprocate much — there remains a wide separation between what are perceived as commercial entertainments and "art house" films, with foreign-language (or even just British) ones almost invariably limited to the latter category.Read more »

Mind-doggling

The latest from Quentin Dupieux is weird ... but maybe not quite weird enough

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Emotions in motion

Climb aboard Michel Gondry's high-school drama 'The We and the I'

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The devil's business

Decadence meets violence in youth-culture extravaganzas 'The Manson Family' and 'Spring Breakers'

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM Ten years after its release (and more than 15 years since Jim Van Bebber started working on it), the legendary cult film The Manson Family returns for special theatrical screenings in conjunction with a remastered Blu-ray release. Also on the bill: short film Gator Green, Van Bebber's most recent project.Read more »

Family plot

Park Chan-wook unleashes his artfully creepy Stoker

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM None of the characters in Park Chan-wook's English-language debut, Stoker, devour a full plate of still-squirming octopus. (For that, see Park's international breakthrough, 2003's Oldboy; chances are the meal won't be duplicated in the Spike Lee remake due later this year.)Read more »

Techulation

'The Singularity' explores the ever-shrinking differences between computers and humans

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cheryl@sfbg.com

FILM Anytime you start taking about a robot uprising, people are going to listen — even if you mean it in a theoretical sense, not in a Cyberdyne Systems sense. Local filmmaker Doug Wolens (he made 2000's Butterfly, about activist Julia Hill) tackles artificial intelligence, nanotechnology, conscious machines, and, yes, science fiction in his new doc The Singularity. I spoke with him recently about all of the above.

San Francisco Bay Guardian What is the singularity?Read more »