Film Features

Shoot for the contents

The Queer Women of Color fest takes over the screen
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"Who is going to tell our stories if we don't?" asks Madeleine Lim, founder and director of the Queer Women of Color Media Arts Project. She has a point. After wracking my brain to recall queer women or trans people of color who have graced a movie screen this year outside of a film festival, all I could come up with was Alice Wu's Saving Face which certainly didn't play at the multiplex. Read more »

Gnaw on this

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cheryl@sfbg.com

There's always room for another film festival in this town, especially when said fest is drowning in blood, guts, and supernatural shenanigans. The San Francisco Independent Film Festival's festering youngest child, Another Hole in the Head, returns this week for its third year of ghouls gone wild.Read more »

Mini mini CinemaScope!

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The term CinemaScope might conjure a 2.66-to-1 vision of an extra-bodacious Marilyn Monroe in How to Marry a Millionaire, or, if you're a certain breed of movie maniac, it might inspire a recitation of Fritz Lang's famous Contempt-uous remark that the format is fine for filming snakes and coffins, but not for capturing people. Bizarre, then, that Liu Jiayin has taken an outmoded approach known for gargantuan celluloid spectacle and revived it — brilliantly — for small-scale digital family portraiture. Read more »

Honeycomb hideout

V??ctor Erice's dreamy allegory The Spirit of the Beehive still stings today
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johnny@sfbg.com

Cast a spell that is what movies (at least nondocumentary ones) are or were supposed to do, and yet how often do they achieve that aim today? V??ctor Erice's original feature, 1973's The Spirit of the Beehive, is partly about the spell a masterful movie can cast, and also is a many-shaded masterpiece that casts an unforgettable spell, a waking dream that disperses in a way that seems to infect the world outside the darkened rooms in which it breathes and lives.Read more »

Pride of Frankenstein

"As Sure as My Name Is Boris Karloff" honors horror's enduring icon
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There were macabre and fantastical American films in the silent era, many starring "Man of a Thousand Faces" Lon Chaney. But horror as a Hollywood genre arguably didn't exist before 1931, when Universal released what may be the two biggest monster franchise titles in cinematic history.Read more »

Blood brothers

DIY filmmakers Rick Popko and Dan West pursue guts and glory
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cheryl@sfbg.com

It's Easter weekend in the Mission District, and despite the rabbit snuffling around Rick Popko's backyard, Cadbury eggs are the last thing on anyone's mind. "I think we've killed everyone we know," Popko explains grimly, grabbing his cell phone to try and recruit one more zombie for the final day of filming on the horror comedy RetarDEAD. Moments later, Popko and RetarDEAD codirector Dan West survey the scene in Popko's basement. Read more »

Live through this

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It would be a mistake to describe Clean as another entry in the already crowded field of movies about drug addicts. Yes, the film's plot follows a familiar arc with serious bottoming out en route to recovery, and yes, the leading role — played by Maggie Cheung — is, typically, the kind of juicy part that allows an actress to stretch her chops to emotional and physical extremes. Read more »

My crones sleep alone

4: berserk reasons to believe in Russian cinema, if not society
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johnny@sfbg.com

Drop Marina (Marina Vochenko), one of the three main characters in Ilya Khrzhanovsky's 4, into Eli Roth's Hostel, and she'd be a Nameless Evil Whore, instead of a leather trench-coated weary Moscow hooker with a wryly crude sense of humor. It's all a matter of perspective, and Roth's even if lampooning American xenophobia is his excuse is boring.Read more »

Girls afraid

Just My Luck and Somersault map wildly different paths to maturity
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cheryl@sfbg.com

As far as Lindsay Lohan goes these days, the title of a recent New York Times essay on her vida loca offers a succinct, if not entirely flattering, summation: "Lindsay Lohan: Portrait of the Party Girl as a Young Artist." The freckled former Disneyite has lately been on the verge though whether it's the verge of a grown-up career breakout or a total Britney Spearsstyle image meltdown seems unclear.Read more »

Anatomy lessons

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Bogart never says "Play it again, Sam" in Casablanca, and most noirs don't feature slinky jazz scores, but the misconceptions persist. In the case of the latter, it's easy enough to see why: A wailing saxophone doesn't seem far removed from the femmes fatales and smoky nightclubs that populate film noir. But, alas, many of these movies were made before Hollywood discovered jazz — a development that largely took place in the 1950s. Read more »