Fall Arts

The curtain calls

Bay Area theater falls into place
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

Theater is where you find it this fall. For instance, at a warehouse party where assembled guests — artists, authors, bons vivants, goatees, and rockers of all stripes — get so carried away that a play suddenly breaks out among them (it can happen). Or in the offices and cubbyholes where a group of Dutch actors retreat midperformance to mine universal truths about the minutiae of mundane alienation. Read more »

Limber up

How to fill your dance card this fall
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com

Are you looking for edginess? Do you prefer subtlety to pizzazz? The upcoming dance calendar has it all, however exotic or traditional your tastes. Fortunately, presenters seem to be aware of the Bay Area's knowledgeable and supportive dancegoing audience. Cal Perfomances' monthlong focus on Twyla Tharp — with the American Ballet Theatre and the Joffrey and Miami City ballets — and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts' presentation of international companies whose work circles around big ideas (reality, peace, identity) are particularly noteworthy. Read more »

Bay Area fall fairs and festivals

A bevy of cool fiestas
|
(0)

Summer may technically be on the outs, but don't put away your baggies, huarache sandals, and that bushy, bushy blond hairdo just yet, all you Gidgets and Big Kahunas out there: it's still Surfin' USA in the Bay. Hell, summer doesn't even start in San Francisco until September at the earliest. You can wax up the board and get busy, stuff the kidlets into the Woody, and hit one of the bevy of cool fiestas listed below, or maybe just lay out on a towel in Dolores Park, waiting for a wayward Lothario or Lothariette to rub cocoa butter on your fleshy hind regions. Read more »

Visual raids

We place our bets on the best gallery and museum shows this fall
|
(0)

Kimberly Chun

1. Billy Childish Who can fathom the mind of a Childish? The insanely productive garage rock legend carves out a space in yet another medium, exhibiting the woodcuts and paintings that inspired him to cofound the stuckism art movement, a figurative response to the Charles Saatchi–championed so-called Young British Artists.

Sept. 5–30. Reception Sept. 5. Needles and Pens, 3253 16th St., SF. (415) 255-1534, www.needles-pens.com

2. "American Cuisine" To serve man? Read more »

She's a rebel

With 51802, choreographer Erika Shuch looks in from the outside at the impact of the California prison system
|
(0)

kimberly@sfbg.com

"See the way he walks down the street / Watch the way he shuffles his feet / My, he holds his head up high / When he goes walking by / He's my kind of guy-ai-ai-ai." The agony and the ecstasy of the Crystals echo through the humid second-floor rehearsal space at Intersection for the Arts, bouncing off the pine floors, streaming out the open window, and pinging off the scaffolding propped on Valencia, above the construction bustle and everyday hustle of the Mission District. Read more »

Fall Arts Intro: Autumn leaves

|
(0)

La-di-dah di-dah-di-dum, ’tis autumn, and after reaching a decision with birdielike precision, the birds have made a beeline for the south. Yet nonfeathered friends of the Bay Area might also have to fly in order to cover all the art openings, concerts, stage shows, movies, and more in store over the next few months. Read more »

Big Idi, little Idi

A look past summer's sour patches to 10 Black Dahlia-led fall delights
|
(0)

cheryl@sfbg.com
Most of 2006's blockbusters (wannabe and otherwise) have already blown by in a sugary cloud of Sour Patch Kids dust. Poseidon's already on DVD; The Da Vinci Code was totally boring; X-Men: The Last Stand killed off Professor X (or did it?); Superman Returns was stomped on by Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest; and Snakes on a Plane did only so-so business despite widespread prerelease hyperventilation. Frankly, my teeth hurt and I'm ready for some meatier cinematic fare — especially the 10 picks that follow. Read more »

Ficks's most anticipated fall ’06 picks

The "Midnites for Maniacs" host chooses three reasons for the season
|
(0)

Inland Empire David Lynch is the reason why I fell (and still am) in love with the cinema. For 30 years, he has continuously made the most creative and hauntingly beautiful films in the world. His new film is shot entirely on high definition cameras and runs close to three frickin’ hours. Lynchian faves Laura Dern and Harry Dean Stanton are back, and there's even a small role by Michael Paré of Streets of Fire fame! Read more »

When the lights go down

Twenty-five more reasons (plus one) to run to and from the theater this fall
|
(0)

› a&eletters@sfbg.com All opening dates subject to change, ’cause that's how Hollywood rolls. The Protector and Jet Li's Fearless Tony Jaa's been trumpeted as "the future of martial arts" (and rightly so — did you see Ong Bak: The Thai Warrior? Holy scalp-cracking!); Jet Li's said Fearless will be his last martial arts picture. Torch. Passed. (Sept. 8 and 22) This Film Is Not Yet Rated Kirby Dick's doc about the creativity-smiting Motion Picture Association of America mixes Michael Moore–like first-person investigative work with feminist First Amendment points. And it's funny. (Sept. Read more »

Yay Area five-oh

Fifty ways to rep film in your fall calendar
|
(0)

johnny@sfbg.com
"Before Vanishing: Syrian Short Cinema" A series devoted to films from Syria kicks off with a shorts program that includes work by Oussama Mohammed. (Sept. 7, PFA; see below)
The Mechanical Man The PFA's vast and expansive series devoted to "The Mechanical Age" includes André Deed's 1921 science fiction vision of a female crime leader and a robot run amok. The screening features live piano by Juliet Rosenberg. (Sept. Read more »