Dance

The great unknown

Together over 30 years, Eiko and Koma are still investigating the secrets of the universe

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

DANCE The United States Bicentennial, 1976, was also the middle of what some have called the Golden Age of American dance. Balanchine premiered Union Jack; Twyla Tharp turned ballet inside out with Baryshnikov in Push Comes to Shove; the Philip Glass-Robert Wilson-Lucinda Childs team had a monster hit with Einstein at the Beach (side note: Berkeley's Cal Performances presents it in October); and the Merce Cunningham Dance Company was invited to the prestigious Avignon Festival for the first time.Read more »

Hits and misses

Nina Haft and Company and Facing East Dance and Music's intriguing, yet uneven, collaboration

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

DANCE When choreographers Sue Li Jue and Nina Haft found that they shared a common interest in exploring the body's memory — of personal experience, history, origins — they decided to make a work in which their individual choreographies would take turns on the stage. Thus the problematic this.placed was born.Read more »

Revisiting the classics

Two veteran choreographers visit the Bay Area with groundbreaking new works

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

DANCE This past weekend two master choreographers, each with more than 30 years experience, still managed to surprise us with fresh goods in their dance bags.

Ohad Naharin's Batsheva Dance Company has a well-deserved reputation for physically lush though highly disciplined choreography. Again presented by San Francisco Performances, Batsheva brought the 2007 Max, whose name may be derived from Naharin's pseudonym of "Maxin Waratt" as the work's composer — or simply is an abbreviation of "maximum." Read more »

In the now

Opening-weekend triumphs at the 2012 Black Choreographers Festival

|
(2)

DANCE On the opening night of its eighth year, the three-weekend "Black Choreographers Festival: Here and Now" deserved its name. The quality of the choreography and the confident performances more than confirmed that BCF is a celebration of excellent contemporary African American choreography. Four out of the five works starred as fine world premieres by local artists. They were stylistically about as diverse as you would want, but this was an evening to rejoice. The Feb. 10 audience at Oakland's Laney College more than agreed.Read more »

First Lady blues

Paufve Dance reinterprets history in standout So I Married Abraham Lincoln

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

DANCE Randee Paufve's voice is quiet. But once you have heard her speak through her dances, you are unlikely to forget the strength of what she has to say. Her craft is impressive, her topics are many-layered, and the resulting choreography is pared down to its essence. Sometimes, I have even wished for a little more looseness just so I could catch my breath.Read more »

Top flight

YEAR IN DANCE 2011: Dancers excelled with exciting new work (and vintage classics), and redefined the concept of "performance space"

|
(0)

arts@sfbg.com

YEAR IN DANCE If you are a trend spotter, you will have noticed two changes within the local dance ecology that probably will influence how we see dance in the foreseeable future.Read more »

Swing, shift

Printz Dance Project pushes the limits of gravity with Hover Space

|
(0)

Standing room only

Local companies score with non-traditional staging

|
(0)

Her way

Krissy Keefer of Dance Brigade celebrates 35 years of rabble-rousing and dance-making

|
(4)

arts@sfbg.com

DANCE Early in the 20th century, Ezra Pound declared "the artist is the antenna of the race." True or false? Do artists have the ability to predict the future, or are they stuck in the present?Read more »

GOLDIES 2011: Katie Faulkner

Dance as "a sense of looseness and abstraction"

|
(0)

GOLDIES In 2005, in deference to the shaky ground we walk on, choreographer Katie Faulkner dubbed her new ensemble little seismic dance company. For an upstart, it seemed an oddly modest name — considering the waves she'd been making, something grander might have been more appropriate. But then that's not Faulkner's style. Her choreography doesn't shout; it grabs you because her dances are full of surprises, finely crafted, and have a strong sense of identity.Read more »