Dance

Take the plunge

Falling for FACT/SF's 'Falling'

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arts@sfbg.com

DANCE FACT/SF's new Falling is a conceptually demanding, convincingly realized 70-minute sextet that annoys, puzzles, and ultimately persuades. Choreographer Charles Slender set his work on six beautifully-trained, well-rehearsed women. He also engaged excellent collaborators.Read more »

Bass and space

Alonzo King LINES Ballet triumphs with a 30th anniversary collaboration

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DANCE Watching premieres by artists with track records is almost as satisfying as encountering pieces by those unknown to you. With the first, you wonder what else they have come with; with the second, you look for a voice that might grow to find even greater resonance.Read more »

Without limits

Cheers to AXIS Dance Company's 25th anniversary

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arts@sfbg.com

DANCE Despite a last-minute change in the program, AXIS Dance Company's 25th anniversary concert was a success. Founded as an ensemble for dancers with and without physical abilities, the company started with homegrown choreography that focused on the reason the company came into being. But under the artistic leadership of Judy Smith, AXIS started to stretch its reach by commissioning professional choreographers. Smith realized that it doesn't matter how good the dancers are; no company can succeed unless it has a solid repertoire.Read more »

Conflicted dictator

'The Madness of the Elephant' uses music and dance to chart Guinea's political history

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DANCE "Next door," you are told in the packed Senegalese restaurant in the heart of the Mission. "Back there," you hear, as a hand points in a very dark, very empty bar you enter through an unmarked door. What's "back there"? It's a large space, perhaps formerly used for storage, lit by blinking Christmas tree lights and two blinding spots. You wonder what a former African dictator would have thought about a celebration of his life being created in such circumstances. Read more »

Mathematical certainty

A triumphant collaboration highlights ODC's 42nd season

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Who am I?

Choreographer Faye Driscoll talks 'You're Me'

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arts@sfbg.com

DANCE CounterPULSE always makes a point of thanking its volunteers. One can only hope that they'll turn up en masse to help clean up after Faye Driscoll and Jesse Zaritt step off the stage this coming weekend. Their You're Me is not exactly what might be called a clean show. Still, if the work-in-progress preview, presented at the end of their residency at the Headlands Center for the Arts almost two years ago, is any indication, the mess is more than worth it. After all, most of us will recognize a mess when we see it.Read more »

Game on

Emerging choreographers Katharine Hawthorne and Tanya Bello offer auspicious premieres

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arts@sfbg.com

DANCE Unlike more commercially competitive markets, the Bay Area is, fortunately, still a place where young choreographers have the freedom to grow. This past weekend, two who are primarily known for dancing other people's works showed their own promising premieres.Read more »

Inspiration is bliss

Anthony Rizzi's glorious mash-up touches down at Kunst-Stoff Arts

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Something old, something new

Eckert and Simonse deliver uneven 'Shared Space Six'
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arts@sfbg.com

DANCE Once a year, long-time colleagues Todd Eckert and Nol Simonse share an evening showcasing their choreography. Unfortunately, the "Shared Space Six" program, presented last weekend at Dance Mission Theater, was not as promising as one would have hoped. Most dispiriting was that the evening's best piece, Eckert's Disparate Affinity, dates back to 2006.Read more »

Dynamic duo

Bebe Miller Company's imperfect, intriguing 'A History'
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arts@sfbg.com

DANCE The Bebe Miller Company's A History at Yerba Buena Center for the Arts last weekend proved to be both exhilarating and frustrating. First, the good: watching two gorgeous dancers engage each other in one encounter after another — both huge and tiny — for over an hour. Gradually, they emerged as two completely different and yet ever-so-compatible characters. Read more »