Watch this depressing time-lapse visualization of Ellis Act evictions

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Each red dot represents an Ellis Act eviction. The size of the circle is determined by the number of units.

A series of red circles explodes on the screen, each representing another rental unit where tenants were driven out by an eviction through no fault of their own.

With a new time-lapse visualization of San Francisco Rent Board data spanning from 1997 to August of 2013, viewers can instantly grasp the cumulative impact of Ellis Act evictions in San Francisco.

It was created by the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project, a newly hatched volunteer effort started to raise awareness about the rising trend of displacement in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Watch it here.

A landlord doesn't need just cause to oust a tenant under the Ellis Act; the law permits a property owner to stop renting units, evict all tenants, and sell the building for another purpose. The recent wave of tech startups and resulting influx of highly paid employees has fueled a spike in Ellis Act evictions as demand for housing has increased.

Working in collaboration with the San Francisco Tenant’s Union, Anti-Eviction Mapping Project volunteer Erin McElroy teamed up with core volunteers Olivia Jackson, Jennifer Fieber and a team of several others to analyze and map data from the San Francisco Rent Board.

The Ellis Act visualization is the first of several planned by the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project. The size of the circles that pop concurrently with each date corresponds with the number of units displaced.

“We started it with the idea of making a comprehensive map that would show things that weren’t being documented by the Rent Board,” McElroy explained. To that end, the project team has spearheaded a survey to gather data on tenant buyouts, harassment by landlords, rent increases, and bogus attempts to use the Ellis Act to carry out an eviction. The survey is available in Spanish and English, with a Chinese version coming soon. 

“We also want to map where people relocate to, in order to display the current and pending gentrification of other areas – particularly the East Bay,” she added.

In the next few weeks, the team will release maps based on data showing owner move-in evictions and foreclosures.

“We don’t have funding or anything like that,” McElroy explained, but the Tenants Union has allowed them use of its office space for meetings. The effort took several months of research and programming, and the result is a story of the displacement of 3,705 housing units over the course of 16 years – all of which can be absorbed a matter of minutes.

Comments

this tro

good slavehouse skee-ball player this one

Posted by ylkdzjhfaslik on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:24 pm

I like yoghurt!

Posted by Lilli Racer X on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:54 pm

no double or hidden meanings

no poetry

no artistry

no political fire

try again tro skeelball playa

but after lunch time

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 1:06 pm

homes regardless of who built them. The problem isn't the willingness or ability to build homes, nor the funding, but rather the land use rules that prevent higher densities.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 10:31 am

So if all we need to do is change some laws and build, let's just municipalize the whole process and take the profit out, so we can build more housing, more quickly that is easily affordable to everyone.

There is no need for private players in housing, just as there is no need for private players in health care.

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 10:45 am

any US city or state. So you can probably infer from that how probable your fantasy is likely to happen.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 10:56 am

when no elected elected politician held the view that we should end slavery

i guess we should have just left slavery alone... eh?

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:08 am

That's almost as good as marcos's claim that cyclists are like slaves.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:22 am

when a private property owner has the power to evict someone from their home, if that tenant does not pay what the property owner wants

then the tenant has become a slave to the property owner

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:42 am

That means that either party are free to terminate the arrangement with notice.

If anything, under rent control, it is the landlord who is the slave because he cannot terminate the lease as easily as the tenant can and, moreover, is stuck with low rent increases.

You already have your uneven playing field and that is why we have Ellis evictions - it's the only way out for property owners.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:50 am

when a tenant would be made homeless by "terminating" his tenancy, the relationship is clearly not voluntary

it is, as i said, de facto slavery

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:03 pm

where that may happen, it is only because the displaced tenant is inflexible. There are always cheaper places, smaller places, places further out or in another city where the rent can be afforded.

The real truth is that people who choose to live in an expensive city should understand that the day may arrive when they have to face financial reality, which is unjustly suspended under rent control.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:19 pm

you don't walk on the streets much do you home boy???

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:32 pm
Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:41 pm
Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 1:13 pm
Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 1:31 pm

who were made homeless as the result of an Ellis eviction.

Yeah, evictions are unrelated to homelessness. That's a good one.

Where's your evidence that landlords are suffering in this town?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 3:07 pm

And nothing you say can be trusted.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 3:36 pm

Cyclists are treated as second class road users but held to first class standards of conduct.

Posted by marcos on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:51 am

then they must be held to equal standards as every other class of road user.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:57 am

Cyclists are held to those standards yet motorists are not held to any standard when they abridge our civil rights, just like the KKK after reconstruction.

Posted by marcos on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:33 pm

citation for a cyclist breaking the law is equivalent to slavery or segregation.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:42 pm

Communism creates slaves. Why do you hate freedom?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:24 am

universal free health care is not communism

nor would be universal housing

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:48 am

at least in the US.

Nobody has "universal housing". That's a myth. there are private housing markets in every nation on the planet, and "free housing for all" would be impossibly expensive and undesirable.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:56 am

second, there are countries that have established housing as a right such as, South Africa, Cuba, and Mexico (look it up)

finally, universal housing, expensive?

more expensive than universal health care which involves providing buildings and beds and *lots* of *very* expensive equipment, professionals, and medications on *top* of the buildings and beds?

universal housing would clearly be less expensive than universal health care

all you need for housing is to build a safe building and keep it standing

that's not nearly as costly as health care

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:18 pm

Would Wall street give you the money?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:31 pm
Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:44 pm

Where do you get it? From the very people you're trying to stiff?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 3:37 pm

Agreed, racer. America's fine public housing projects are a testament to the excellence of your proposal.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:39 pm
Posted by bdorgi on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:41 pm

Stop being a wage salve!

Posted by Lilli Racer X on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:56 pm
Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 1:03 pm
Posted by bdorgij on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:40 pm

No private players? The SF city government will build houses and hand them over to salt of the earth entitled aging hippies?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 10:57 am
yep

exactly the way most european countries now hand everyone free health care

same principle...

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:09 am

Thank goodness loons like you are a dying breed. Hie to Oakland, commie!

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:22 am

instead of just using the word "loon" as your argument

how about actually putting forward an actual

argument

if you are capable of doing so

(which i doubt)

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:39 am

Or is that somehow totally different?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:46 am

i almost always combine them with an actual argument as well

you, almost never do

and by the way

i'm still waiting for your actual argument

do you have one?

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:58 am

trolling quicker than anyone else here.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:12 pm

Although their economies haven't been working so well recently, ya know?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:23 am

and a lot more of them have homes

seems like we should follow europe's lead to me

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:37 am

you see tax rates of 50% to 60% routinely in Europe, and on lower incomes as well.

What works in Europe may not work in the U.S. What's important of having a choice of systems rather than everywhere being the same. Then individuals can make informed choices about which system they prefer and choose to live in.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:45 am

have lowered the quality of life, of europeans

including poor europeans

Posted by racer x on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 11:55 am

poorer than they otherwise would be.

Anyway it is moot because no US politician dares to stand on a platform of far higher taxes.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 12:12 pm

US with half the population poor or nearly poor. When empirical evidence contradicts your world view, you respond with shit like "loons should move to Oakland."

What's your next response?

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 3:11 pm

city they clearly cannot afford to be in.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 3:38 pm

That's all you got?

People that "are better suited to live in Oakland" will choose to live there.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 3:49 pm

because they cannot afford SF. That's the same reason I do not live in Switzerland.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 21, 2013 @ 3:57 pm

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