Oakland to decide on controversial stop-and-frisk advocate Bill Bratton

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This image appeared with a post on activist website Bay of Rage, urging protesters to speak out against Bratton.
Image from bayofrage.com

On Tuesday, Oakland City Council will consider approving a $250,000 contract for an outside security consulting team, which could include controversial roving police chief and private security contractor William Bratton. With Oakland’s understaffed police department facing a 23 percent rise in violent crime over the past year, the Council’s Public Safety Committee unanimously recommended last week that the full Council approve a new round of funding for Boston-based police consultant Strategic Policy Partnership LLC. The firm intends to bring on Bratton as part of a new team of private policing experts to advise OPD.

At the five-hour Public Safety Committee meeting on Jan. 15, Oakland activists crowded into the chamber to voice concerns that Bratton—a nationally known proponent of “zero tolerance” policing and New York City’s extremely controversial stop-and-frisk policy—would be tapped as a member of the consulting team. Pressure from the community prompted committee members to tack on a provision suggesting that an alternative to Bratton be considered in the final contract.

Oakland Mayor Jean Quan and Police Chief Howard Jordan both voiced enthusiastic support for Bratton’s appointment.  In a letter sent last Wednesday urging the Council to approve the contract, Quan wrote: “Bratton is uniquely suited to helping us perfect how that system works here.” She went on to promise that racial profiling would not be tolerated in Oakland.

Oakland attorney Dan Siegel, a former legal advisor to Quan, expressed dismay over Bratton’s possible consultancy to a lively group of protesters outside last Tuesday’s meeting. “Stop-and-frisk does not work,” he said. “Bratton is exactly what we do not need in the city of Oakland.”

Although Bratton did not attend last Tuesday’s meeting, he has publicly expressed interest in working in Oakland, despite the vocal opposition.  “I'm still very desirous of working in Oakland … I think the assistance that I can provide will be of value to the city,” Bratton told the Oakland Tribune following Wednesday’s protests.

From Boston, to Los Angeles, to New York, Bratton has implemented and championed a controversial mix of anti-crime measures, making him one of the nation’s most divisive and visible law enforcement officials. 

Lauded by supporters as America’s “Top Cop,” he has twice served as president of the influential Police Executive Research Forum (PERF), which was responsible for coordinating a police response to the Occupy Wall Street Movement. He also serves as vice chair of the Homeland Security Advisory Council.

Serving as police chief in New York from 1994 to 1996 and Los Angeles from 2002 to 2009, Bratton built a national reputation as an outspoken proponent of stop-and-frisk, a tactic often linked with racial profiling. According to data compiled by the New York ACLU, the procedure disproportionally targets black and Latino residents. Earlier this month, a U.S. District Court Judge in New York deemed stop-and-frisk to be unconstitutional and issued an injunction limiting the policy in the Bronx. In July, when San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee suggested exploring stop-and-frisk in San Francisco, local civil liberties advocates balked.

Bratton is also an unabashed supporter of zero-tolerance policing, a method that stems from the “broken-windows theory” and encourages police to make arrests for minor infractions such as graffiti, litter, panhandling, prostitution or other petty offenses which are presumed to create an environment that breeds serious crime.

Bratton’s controversial tactics have been credited with reducing crime rates during his tenure in New York and Los Angeles. His work to diversify the LAPD and build closer ties between police and the community also drew praise from the Los Angeles chapter of the ACLU.

But in Oakland, local police reform advocates question the long-term efficacy of Bratton’s methods.

Rachel Herzing, co-director of Oakland-based Critical Resistance, an advocacy group that is part of a coalition of local organizations mobilizing against Bratton, charges that he deals in “quick fixes.” In the long run, she argues, his methods do not reduce crime but rather relocate it.

Bratton’s “all cops, no services approach does not work anywhere, and will not work in Oakland,” Herzing told the Guardian. “The aggressive sweeps Bratton is known for in New York ultimately just displace people, and drive them away from essential services. [These tactics] aren’t appropriate policing responses.”

The public outcry at last Tuesday’s Public Safety Committee meeting drew responses from new Council members Lynette Gibson McElhaney and Dan Kalb. McElhaney, whose District 3 includes some of the city’s lower-income neighborhoods plagued with high crime rates, told colleagues that Bratton may come with “too much baggage.” Ultimately, McElhaney said, his presence in Oakland might prove to be counterproductive.

Speaking to the Guardian on Jan. 21, McElhaney said she was not yet sure if she would vote to approve the contract. “We are wrestling with some very big issues here,” she said.  “I am clearly concerned about some of Bratton’s tactics but I am also interested in his results in some of the cities he has worked in. I do know he has lowered homicide rates.”

She added that the overarching goal of addressing crime in Oakland should not be lost in the debate surrounding Bratton. “There’s the totality of the contract I’m considering... in the end, I’m more interested in the outcome as opposed to the individuals.”

In an effort to diffuse controversy at the Jan. 15 meeting, McElhaney and Kalb successfully amended the committee recommendation to urge Strategic Policy Partnership to consider potential alternatives to Bratton.

But given Bratton’s national profile and controversial approach to policing, his inclusion in the consulting contract will likely take center stage at the full Council Meeting on Tuesday. Both Bratton’s opponents and supporters plan to arrive in force at Tuesday’s Council meeting, and as of yet it’s uncertain which side will prevail.

Comments

move to SF. However, a number of tenants I've had that have moved on, have moved on to Oakland.

Rent there is half of SF, but your risk of being mugged or shot more than doubles.

Posted by Guest on Jan. 22, 2013 @ 2:56 pm

"Rent there is half of SF"

Wrong as usual, troll.

From rentjungle.com

Oakland:
As of December, 2012, average apartment rent within 10 miles of Oakland, CA is $1814.
One bedroom apartments in Oakland rent for $1659 a month on average and two bedroom apartment rents average $1836.

San Francisco:
As of December, 2012, average apartment rent within 10 miles of San Francisco, CA is $2106.
One bedroom apartments in San Francisco rent for $1845 a month on average and two bedroom apartment rents average $2364.

"Rent there is half of SF"?

Take some time off from trolling and learn some math skills.

Posted by Guest on Jan. 23, 2013 @ 3:31 pm

the ROI per square foot was about 50%

you have to factior in Oakland's higher parcel taxes and higher insurance, plus a DBI that is even more corrupt than SF's.

Oh, er, and crime,

Posted by anon on Jan. 23, 2013 @ 3:53 pm

Reading some of these vile comments, phew! The wingnuts poured on here for this topic.

I've known for some time (and as demonstrated from these comments) that the conservatives/right-wingnut jobs (most likely calling themselves a "moderate") would live most comfortably in a full-blown dictatorship as long as THEY personally are left alone. They don't care whose Constitutional rights are trampled on or violated as long as they personally have some illusion of "safety" in their paranoid, afraid-of-their-own-shadow sick minds.

This statement has been attributed to Benjamin Franklin, but I don't know that he said it:

"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety.

My version is a little different:

Those who would give up liberty for the ILLUSION of safety deserve neither Liberty or Safety.

Posted by Guest on Jan. 22, 2013 @ 11:40 pm

a progressive voter do you?

Posted by matlock on Jan. 22, 2013 @ 11:48 pm

and even the dissenter said it was only on "technical grounds".

Done deal, Tim. Move on.

Posted by Guest on Jan. 23, 2013 @ 6:55 am

"She went on to promise that racial profiling would not be tolerated in Oakland."

A promise from a politician? That's worth nothing. So then ethnic profiling will be allowed because these politicians love to "promise" the opposite of what will actually be the case.

Posted by Guest on Jan. 23, 2013 @ 4:12 pm
Posted by anon on Jan. 23, 2013 @ 4:39 pm

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