Matt Haney jumping for joy over school board results

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At a party at the Brick and Mortar club in the Mission -- a combined celebration for David Campos, Matt Haney, and Steve Ngo --  school board nominee Matt Haney currently stands at 13.29% of the vote, enough to get him on the board. And he was jumping up and down with delight when he saw the numbers were turning in his favor.

After he calmed down (a bit) he talked to us about the teachers union boycotting endorsements for sitting members of the board. "For me, it was never a negative dynamic. I got along with everyone on the board, and I respect the teachers union and what they do.

"They just want better education here in San Francisco, and I'm going to try my best to help with that."

I talked to David Campos about Measure C, the affordable housing trust fund proposal. "I'm very excited, I always knew that we needed a secure source for affordable housing. It's not fully what we need, but it's going in the right direction."

He went on to say that we shouldn't settle for less and when it comes to these measures, "the devil is in the details."

Campos was also happy for Haney: "Matt ran a strong campaign, and I personally think his voice is needed on the board."

Haney said about winning, "I'm very excited. I have a job where I am responsible to the youth and students. I couldn't wish for a more humbling position."

he said about his campaign, "It was tough today, because a lot of people didn't make their decision until the end, so it's hard to assess where you stand. But we had a grassroots campaign that went door to door, and that may have been the difference."

Steve Ngo, who was the top finisher in his reelection to the City College of San Francisco Board of Trustees, talked to us about his priority, now that he's serving again: "To save City College. To do that we have to stick to the plan we put together in September. To reassure the opportunities for our students." 

 

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