Mexico warns citizens: use extreme caution in Arizona

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Arizona state flag
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It’s no surprise to anyone who has watched Newsom stubbornly refuse to take responsibility for the consequences of his flawed juvenile immigrant policy that the mayor is playing coy when it comes to the Board of Supervisors’ and the City Attorney's attempts to institute a boycott of Arizona.

The real surprise in the fallout around Arizona SB 1070 is that the legislation doesn’t include a clause whereby all “aliens” must find a picture of the Arizona state flag, cut out the star in it, and wear it as a “badge,” much like the Nazis required of the Jews.

But Mexico does gets the threat this hateful legislation poses to its citizens. In a new twist on travel advisories, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Mexico has warned its citizens in Arizona to exercise extreme caution, whether they are demonstrating against Arizona SB 1070, going about their everyday affairs, attending classes or contemplating accepting work offered from a car on a highway.

“It is important to act with prudence and respect local laws,” the Mexican consulate states. It notes that the new law won’t take effect until 90 days after the end of the current session of the Arizona state legislature, but warns, “however, as was clear during the legislative process, there is a negative political environment for migrant communities and for all Mexican visitors.”

The consulate recommends that Mexican nationals carry available documentation, even before the new law takes place so as to “help avoid needless confrontations.”

“As long as no clear criteria defined for when, where and who the authorities will inspect, it must be assumed that every Mexican citizen may be harassed and questioned without further cause at any time,” the consulate states.

“The new law will also make it illegal to hire or be hired from a motor vehicle stopped on a roadway or highway, regardless of the immigration status of those involved. While these rules are also not yet in force, extreme caution should be used.”

The consulate concludes by reminding folks that “Mexican nationals who are in the United States, regardless of their immigration status, have inalienable human rights and can resort to protection mechanisms under international law, U.S. federal law, and Arizona state law. The functions of the five Mexican consulates in Arizona (Phoenix, Tuscon, Yuma, Nogales and Douglas) include providing legal advice to all Mexicans who consider that they have been subjected to any abuse by the authorities.”

It recommends that Mexicans requiring consular assitance in Arizona use the following toll-free number, available 24 hours a day, seven days a week:1.877.6326.6785 (1.877.63CONSUL).

Comments

Any foreign national living or working in any OTHER country is required to carry their visa and/or other proof of their status....The UK allows only 6 months per calendar year, Turkey imposes strict fines and may ban re-entry to overstays, and, well....China just jails or shoots you. Actually, at least in AZ, it has always been a crime not to have ID when asked by the police for it and you could be jailed regardless of citizenship. Gun sales along the US border have risen drastically since the rancher shooting and without legal intervention, violence is imminent as Americans defend their lives, property, family and country.

Posted by Guest on Apr. 27, 2010 @ 1:54 pm

I find the consulate's mention of respecting local laws to be ironic. Perhaps the 15% of Arizona that's living there illegally should start respecting local laws.

Posted by Guest on Apr. 27, 2010 @ 2:24 pm

Mexico has a path to citizenship too, can't just move there and legally start going about your business. They will boot you out if you break the law.

search for

"Now Available for the First Time in English: The Immigration Law of Mexico"

"
General Summary of the Law

Mexico’s immigration law may be divided into three general areas: non-immigrants, immigrants and permanent residents. There are 21 categories of nonimmigrant and eight categories of immigrant. The nature of each of these classifications is established and described in the Act and the Regulations. The application procedures for each are set out in the Manual. There are also specific provisions governing the period of stay for each category, as well as rights (if any) to change status, extend the stay, or modify permitted activities.

Permanent residency in Mexico is obtained only after one has held immigrant status for the required period of time. The Act, Regulations and Manual prescribe in detail the procedures for changing from immigrant status to that of permanent resident.

The Table of Contents of the Manual, reproduced below, perhaps best demonstrates the comprehensive nature of Mexico’s immigration law.
"

Posted by glen matlock on Apr. 27, 2010 @ 3:25 pm

Guest One, you have it correct. any Mexican national genuinely visiting the US and/or AZ is already required to carry his passport and visa with him at all times - the same applies to all foreign nationals. So this "warning" from Mexico is just posturing and hyperbole.

If a cop stops a foreign tourist and asks for id, as they do ni all 50 States, the innocent tourist simply shows his passport, with valid visa as necessary, and that is that.

So SB 1070 only targets those who are here illegally regardless of origins. That includes illegal Irish and excludes legal Mexicans. and propfiling is explicitly banned.

So where is the problem here?

Posted by Tom Foolery on Apr. 27, 2010 @ 10:43 pm

Guest One, you have it correct. any Mexican national genuinely visiting the US and/or AZ is already required to carry his passport and visa with him at all times - the same applies to all foreign nationals. So this "warning" from Mexico is just posturing and hyperbole.

If a cop stops a foreign tourist and asks for id, as they do ni all 50 States, the innocent tourist simply shows his passport, with valid visa as necessary, and that is that.

So SB 1070 only targets those who are here illegally regardless of origins. That includes illegal Irish and excludes legal Mexicans. and propfiling is explicitly banned.

So where is the problem here?

Posted by Tom Foolery on Apr. 27, 2010 @ 10:44 pm

The problem, rather obviously, is getting stopped and hassled all the time merely because you look hispanic.

Posted by jw on Apr. 28, 2010 @ 12:13 am

Mexico

In the first six months of 2005 alone, more than 120,000 people from Central America have been deported to their countries of origin. This is a significantly higher rate than in 2002, when for the entire year, only 130,000 people were deported [15]. Another important group of people are those of Chinese origin, who pay about $5,500 to smugglers to be taken to Mexico from Hong Kong. It is estimated that 2.4% of rejections for work permits in Mexico correspond to Chinese citizens [16]. Many women from Eastern Europe, Asia, and Central and South America are also offered jobs at table dance establishments in large cities throughout the country causing the National Institute of Migration (INM) in Mexico to raid strip clubs and deport foreigners who work without the proper documentation [17]. In 2004, the INM deported 188,000 people at a cost of $10 million [18]. Illegal immigration of Cubans through Cancún tripled from 2004 to 2006. [19]

In September 2007, Mexican President Calderón harshly criticized the United States government for the crackdown on illegal immigrants, saying it has led to the persecution of immigrant workers without visas. “I have said that Mexico does not stop at its border, that wherever there is a Mexican, there is Mexico,” he said.[79]

In October 2008, Mexico tightened its immigration rules and agreed to deport Cubans using the country as an entry point to the US. It also criticized U.S. policy that generally allows Cubans who reach U.S. territory to stay. Cuban Foreign Minister said the Cuban-Mexican agreement would lead to "the immense majority of Cubans being repatriated."[80]

Posted by glen matlock on Apr. 28, 2010 @ 10:34 am