The Daily Blurgh: Sugar & Sassy & Death & Taxes (Donald Duck remix)

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay and beyond

The 53rd San Francisco International Film Festival takes place next week, but over in France preparations are being made to reset the international festival circuit clock when Cannes '10 kicks off in May. The full-line up has been announced, and I am already curious about the new titles from Apichatpong Weerasethakul, Godard, Gregg Araki, Hong Sangsoo, Alejandro González Iñárritu, and many more. Here's to some of these being snatched up for SFIFF 54. And yes, there were movies 54 years ago.

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Pot without THC: O'Douls for stoners or scientific breakthrough?

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Phil Bronstein pushes for journalist Fight Club: "But it's much more lively to measure breath on the mirror of our business by its deathmatches, where our history is rich and passionate. In the 1800's, San Francisco rivals in the newspaper world were shooting each other on the street. Charles de Young, a Chronicle founder, popped a cap in politician Isaac Kalloch. De Young's brother, M.H., was shot by businessman Adolph Spreckels over an article in the paper. And James King, editor of the Daily Evening Bulletin, was killed right downtown on Montgomery."

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We completely surrender to Sugar & Sassy -- and will beg them to join our electroclash-revival band. Or at least lend their names.

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Did you notice the Angry Americans today in Union Square (and I'm not talking about the moms who narrowly snatched that pair of Burberry mules at Lohman's)?

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No one told us there would be a BLOOD CANNON!!!!!

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Happy tax day from Motorhead:

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And so, courtesy of Wonkette, does "A Walt Disney Donald Duck" -- guns! guns! guns!

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