Street Art

Trans activists honored in Clarion Alley mural

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It was important to Tanya Wischerath that the crowds who came to last weekend's Clarion Alley Block Party got to see the latest addition to its collection of murals. The new piece is a stirring tribute to transwomen activists, done in jewel tones on a background of night sky and stained glass. "I was told nine days before the street fair [that I got the wall], and I was adamant that I would have something finished by then," the artist said in an email. We're glad -- it's lovely.  Read more »

Girl on wall

Badassery abounds at Los Muros Hablan, where Sofia Maldonado teaches her brand of Puerto Rican feminist street art

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caitlin@sfbg.com

STREET SEEN Welcome welcome, friends, to my new column. You'll wanna check back here for Bay Area style — clothes, weed, art, sex, y'know. But this week, international women's studies: a Puerto Rican street artist on domestic violence, in her home town.

It may have been the moment of my recent trip to check out San Juan's first street art festival.Read more »

Frog killers in the heat: San Juan's first street art festival

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Sego painted a coqui. That makes sense because the soft-spoken Mexican mural artist dabbles luminously in the animal kingdom, improbably creating detailed scenes of magical realism with little more than aerosol cans.

The coqui is Puerto Rico's mascot, the tranquil frog that defines the nighttime soundscape, and plagues tourists unused to the noise with its chirps. Sego's wall, part of the first street art festival in San Juan history Los Muros Hablan, was an "aww" moment for the passing cars (and there are a lot of them. Sweltering San Juan lives and dies by the air-conditioned automobile.) Read more »

The real McGee

As street artist Twist, he launched a thousand spray cans. But who does Barry McGee's gallery art inspire?

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caitlin@sfbg.com

STREET ART Gone are the days when Barry McGee, or Twist, or Ray Fong, or whatever alias he happened to be painting under at the time, stalked the San Francisco streets throwing up 3-D screws, Clarion Alley stunners, and his much-admired tags. Nowadays, he exhibits in big-deal gallery shows, like his mid-career retrospective that opened to much fanfare at the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive on August 24.Read more »

"The f*cking building was looking like a f*cking jail. But now it's like a museum."

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See video

A guy who is on the board of the Oakland Museum of California buys an abandoned 36,000 square foot warehouse (1350 Fourth St., Berk.) He doesn't realize the structure is a hot spot for local graffheads, but when he sees the art inside his new purchase he decides to roll with it, at least until he turns it into office space. Enter Endless Canvas, the superlative Bay street art site that Mr. Property Owner taps to curate the building. Read more »

Pro-life Bernal billboard corrected by feminist vandals

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[H/t Bernalwood]

Those in favor of a women's right to choose need no longer avert their eyes from that squalling pro-life billboard on the corner of Cortland and Andover -- some midnight marauders "corrected" its anti-choice sentiment. Who says there's no good street art in San Francisco?

Graffiti, now: Guerrero Gallery shows USDA prime street writers

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There was no wine and cheese at the opening of "Leave the Beef on the BBQ." There were massive slabs of meat though, onto which Guerrero Gallery owner Andres Guerrero slathered sauce and tried to look inconspicuous.

The crowd, which spilled out onto the sunny Saturday streets of San Francisco on August 25, was mainly there to see art anyhow. The exhibit was the most diverse graffiti-themed assemblage Guerrero had shown to date, and the graff heads in attendance had a lot to look at -- not to mention reflect on. Graffiti, if the works inside were anything to judge by, is at the junction of, about 70 different artistic directions.  Read more »

Walls born at the world's first all-female street art fest -- including one now slated to die

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New York-New Jersey street artist LNY recently attended the world's first all-female street art festival. He reports on the highs and lows of Living Walls for the Guardian

Atlanta's Living Walls street art conference celebrated its third year of mural-making August 15-19, changing the landscape of a city where most movement is done by car at 60 miles per hour. Having established itself as one of the best gatherings of street arts out there, the festival celebrated its third year by hosting a historic first: an all-female cast of artists.

I, a dude, was invited to the conference as a guess speaker, so consider the following account slightly influenced by me being super-stoked about all the work going up around me. Read more »

Finally: All-female street art takes over ATL

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As colorful and diverse as the global street art scene is these days, it's still overwhelmingly a boy's game. That's why we're so stoked to hear about the first days of Living Walls Atlanta, a street art conference in its third year that decides to step out and feature all-female artists in 2012 Wed/15-Sun/19. Its lead organizer Monica Campana and her team have attracted an ace crew for what by all accounts will be the first all-women global street art festival.

New York-New Jersey wheatpaste artist LNY is on the ATL scene now and will have a Guardian exclusive for us next week. Read on for a preview of some of the baddie artists featured at this year's Living Walls.

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Generations confer over La Peña's second skin

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I'm sitting in on a meeting between two generations of muralists. In name, our encounter was designed as an interview about La Peña Cultural Center's plans to redo its decades-old facade, a historic piece that right now is a 3-D tableau named "Song of Unity" and meant to represent the people of North and South America coming together in art.

But it has become clear to me the interviewer that's it's way more momentous to let these groups talk largely unimpeded by my questions. Two people who created the mural in 1978 are speaking with two people who will design its rebirth in 2012 about changes in the world of street art over the last 34 years. It's the first time the four have met together. Assasinated Chilean artist-activist Victor Jara's detached hands strum a guitar in silent soundtrack over us as we sit on folding chairs in front of the mural in question. 

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