Clean Power SF

Exposing PG&E's other "cozy relationship," with Mayor Ed Lee

|
(9)

News outlets from Sacramento to Los Angeles are crowing about Pacific Gas & Electric Company's alleged "cozy relationship" with the utlity that oversees it, the California Public Utilities Commission.Read more »

Revisionist future

Politics are holding back San Francisco's best shot at reducing carbon emissions

|
(6)

news@sfbg.com

Acidified oceans. Dirty air. Superstorms. Food shortages. Mass migration. War. The International Panel on Climate Change last week released the final installment of its latest authoritative report on the catastrophic effects of global climate change.

In no uncertain terms, the report states, it is urgent that steps be taken to mitigate the worst impacts. The world's cities are the most at risk — yet hold the greatest potential for turning the tide, IPCC scientists noted. Making cities greener is one of the most effective ways to minimize climate change.Read more »

The miraculous and mysterious, disappearing, reappearing Clean Power SF data

|
(38)

The fight for clean power in San Francisco just got a whole lot dirtier.

In an update to the City’s Climate Action Strategy report, a prominent section discussing goals to use renewable energy featured CleanPowerSF -- and then suddenly it didn’t.Read more »

Clean Power SF still moving forward

|
(10)

news@sfbg.com 

Dec. 19 marked the 100th anniversary of the Raker Act, federal legislation that specifically called for San Francisco to directly distribute the water and electricity generated by the O'Shaughnessy Dam to its residents and for their benefit. The city does so with the water, through the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission, but Pacific Gas & Electric used its power and connections to take control of the electricity and keep it, corrupting the political system for nearly a century in the process.Read more »

Historic, veto-proof vote launches CleanPowerSF

|
(24)

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors today cast an historic vote that was more than a decade in the making, approving the CleanPowerSF program – which challenges PG&E’s monopoly by offering 100 percent renewable energy directly to city residents – on an 8-3 vote that would be enough to override an implied veto threat by Mayor Ed Lee.Read more »

Committee approves CleanPowerSF over downtown opposition

|
(51)

The question of whether San Francisco creates a renewable energy program that offers an alternative to Pacific Gas & Electric got its first major hearing at City Hall today, with the business community claiming it's too expensive and supporters arguing that the time has come for the city to address climate change and the long-term energy needs of city residents and businesses.Read more »

PG&E union mounts attack on Clean Power SF

|
(31)

The union that represents PG&E workers -- and has opposed every single public-power initiative in modern San Francisco history -- just launched an attack on Clean Power SF. And the union's business representative is having a hard time explaining exactly why he's working with PG&E to try to undermine this modest step toward public power.Read more »

Approve clean power SF

The plan's got flaws, but it's all we've got

|
(20)

EDITORIAL The clean energy plan for San Francisco isn't perfect. It's going to cost residents a bit extra to join a sustainable, city-run electricity system. Officials at the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission figure that only about 100,000 residential customers will pay the premium to buy renewable energy — fewer if Pacific Gas and Electric Company launches a huge marketing effort to drive potential customers away. And PG&E will still control the distribution lines, the billing, the meters — and will make most of the profit.Read more »

Guardian editorial: Making Clean Power SF work

|
(1)


EDITORIAL The way the San Francisco Chronicle describes it, the city's new green power program "won't come cheap." That's a line that Pacific Gas and Electric Co. will use over and over again in the next few months as the city finally prepares to get into the retail electricity business, 98 years after Congress mandated public power for San Francisco. Clean Power SF will offer 100 percent clean energy — and yes, right now, this spring, it will cost a little bit more than buying nuclear and coal power from PG&E.

But that price differential will change dramatically in the next few years — if the city goes forward not just with buying and aggregating power from the commercial market but developing renewable energy on its own.

That's the key to the future of Clean Power SF — and as a proposed contract to get the system up and running comes to the Board of Supervisors, the need for a city build-out of at least 210 megawatts of energy generation capacity is, and must be, an essential part of the plan. Read more »