Bikes

City officials pedal and praise on Bike to Work Day

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photos by Luke Thomas/Fog City Journal

Almost every top city official pedaled up to City Hall this morning for the 17th annual Bike to Work Day, all pledging their support for expanding safe cycling opportunities in San Francisco and declaring the bike to be a vital part of the city's transportation infrastructure that will only grow in importance in the coming years. Read more »

The essential SF bike map

Bike routes today, tomorrow, and still to come

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Click here for a pdf version of this map

 

The fun side of bikes

The Fossil Fool pushes bicycle advocacy in the direction of music, art and parties

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steve@sfbg.com

Paul Freedman, a.k.a. the Fossil Fool, is a singer-songwriter and builder of elaborate art bikes who lives in San Francisco's Mission District. Since 2001, when he decided to apply his Harvard University education to building custom bikes, accessories, pedal-powered products, and mobile sound systems, Freedman created Fossil Fool and Rock the Bike to sell his creations and provide a platform for his performances and alternative transportation advocacy work.Read more »

Cycling race

Advocates for minority bike riders find ways to spread the word

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caitlin@sfbg.com

In contrast to the alley cat fixie fiends and placid Venice Beach cruisers, some of Los Angeles' most ardent bicyclists were going unnoticed and underserved by bike advocacy groups. Working class Latinos are often the only ones on two wheels in several of the city's most disadvantaged communities — but you weren't going to catch them at Critical Mass or grabbing a seat at L.A. County Bike Coalition meetings.Read more »

The rise of bike culture

The streets of San Francisco aren't just for cars anymore

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steve@sfbg.com

San Francisco has quickly peddled back into the front of the pack among bicycle-friendly U.S. cities, regaining the ground it lost during a four-year court injunction against new bike projects that was partially lifted in November 2009 and completely ended last June.Read more »

Bike Party!

San Francisco's newest group ride marks a less confrontational, more booty-shaking phase in the city's bike movement

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caitlin@sfbg.com, steve@sfbg.com

On Friday night, May 6, hundreds of bikes lean against the massive pillars holding up the Palace of Fine Arts' rotunda, a colorful array of plastic flowers and stereo speakers affixed to their baskets and trailers.Read more »

Kids on bikes

San Francisco is seeing increased cycling ridership, yet children are being largely left behind

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news@sfbg.com

To meet San Francisco's policy goal of having 20 percent of all vehicle trips made by bicycle by the year 2020, advocates and officials say the city will need to make cycling more attractive to the young and old, from age 8 to 80. But there are some built-in challenges to getting more school children on bikes, even if there has been some recent progress, as demonstrated during the Bike to School Day in April.Read more »

Avalos and Chiu vie for bike vote at Sunday Streets

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If yesterday's jam-packed Sunday Streets event in the Mission was any indication, only two mayoral candidates are vying for the votes of bicyclists, skaters, and strolling families who appreciate carfree streets: John Avalos and David Chiu. They were the only two candidates who showed up, and both had lots of supporters with signs to help campaign for them, with Avalos supporters enjoying a slight edge in overall numbers.Read more »

Survivin' sunshine: Sunday Streets Great Highway, 4/10/11

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A friend made a good point today: in case shit hits the fan, you could do worse than own a bicycle. Think about it: earthquake, tsunami, governmental shut-down, what have you -- gas is not going to be cheap or easy to get, and you're still going to need to be able to get around. Why the morbid turn of conversation? Probs because we spent today cruising through (a completely unmorbid) Sunday Streets, Great Highway edition.

Crashing waves and hordes of bikers, you see, were the catalyst for all the survivalist talk -- as well as my own, admittedly poor follow-up thought that bike folk could build coalitions with the gun rights groups over the question of self-sufficiency.

But around me, folks were reveling in their break from excessive use of fossil fuels, not morosing out. The second Sunday Streets of the year was not the most densely packed and attraction-studded event the series has held (the Mission, etc., makes for better people watching, strictly speaking) but it was the most pleasant this year to traverse on a bike. Read more »