Apple

The Chron's token conservative on tech hegemony

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It's always fun when things are so screwy in town that the leading conservative writer at the Chron starts to agree (even just a little) with the crazy commie at this blog.

Debra Saunders is unhappy with the way the Apple store is moving into Union Square. Not because she hates Apple; she's a Republican who loves all business. Not because she wants to save the fountain or thinks the urban design is ugly; she's all for new development.Read more »

Senate goes after tax-cheating Apple

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Glad I'm not the only one who thinks its an outrage that the world's most valuable company, with vast revenues and huge cash surpluses, is looking for ways to avoid paying federal taxes. Read more »

Nice to know our tech friends aren't paying taxes

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Since Mayor Ed Lee has decided that tech companies are the future of San Francisco, it's nice to note that these outfits are often no better than the cheating robber barons of old -- or the modern Leona Helmsleys. The Campaign for America's Future notes that Apple dodged a $9.2 billion tax bill that would have been enough to cover most of the sequester cuts this spring. Read more »

Dick Meister: Apple's unethical innovation

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By Dick Meister

Dick Meister, former labor editor of the SF Chronicle and KQED-TV Newsroom, has covered labor and politics for more than a half-century. Contact him through his website, www.dickmeister.com, which includes more than 300 of his columns.

Apple's position as a worldwide leader in technological innovation has brought huge rewards to those who run the company or own stock in it, and has raised co-founder Steve Jobs to demigod status. But the men and women who manufacture Apple's highly profitable products are not doing well – and the AFL-CIO wants very much for that to change.

"When it comes to technology," notes AFL-CIO President Richard Trumka, " Apple has revolutionized its industry and set a standard other companies aspire to meet . It is now the biggest publicly traded company in the world, worth a whopping $465 billion."

But, adds Trumka, "Apple's record-breaking success comes at a back-breaking price." Read more »