Steven T. Jones

“Tale of Two Davids” casts Campos as the progressive hero

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David Campos presented “a tale of two Davids” tonight [Thu/23] in his first debate with David Chiu in their race to replace Assemblymember Tom Ammiano in AD17, contrasting his solid progressive record against Chiu’s more pragmatic approach. Chiu reinforced the narrative by repeatedly touting his “effectiveness” and record at City Hall.Read more »

Judge says state erred in 8 Washington property transfer

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A San Francisco judge has ruled that the California State Lands Commission illegally exempted from environmental review a property transfer it approved in 2012 to facilitate the controversial 8 Washington project — a ruling that casts doubt over a dubious tactic the agency commonly uses to expedite development, as well as the legal judgment of an agency that is Read more »

Death and Facebook

GOOD TECH ISSUE: Social media can play an important role during tragedies

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steve@sfbg.com

My appreciation for Facebook had been waning in recent years. Although I still use it almost every day — mostly as a storehouse for digital photos and events listings or as a procrastination tool — I was becoming turned off by its increasing commercialization and ubiquity.Read more »

State of the City: spin over substance

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It was maddening to watch Mayor Ed Lee deliver his annual State of the City address on Jan. 17. This was pure politics, from the staged backdrop of housing construction at Hunters Point Shipyard to the use of "regular people" props to the slate of vague and contradictory promises he made.

"This place, the shipyard, links our proud past to an even more promising future," was how Lee began his hour-plus, invite-only address.Read more »

Double standard for the role of voters in SF waterfront development?

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As our article on San Francisco waterfront development was hitting the presses last week, California State Lands Commission Chief Counsel Mark Meier made public a letter questioning the legality of a local initiative in circulation that would submit waterfront projects that break height limits to a vote of the people.Read more »

State of the City speech filled with unsupported promises

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It was maddening to watch Mayor Ed Lee deliver his annual State of the City address this morning. This was pure politics, from the staged backdrop of housing construction at Hunters Point Shipyard to the use of “regular people” props to the slate of vague and contradictory promises he made.

“This place, the shipyard, links our proud past to an even more promising future,” was how Lee began his hour-plus, invite-only address.Read more »

Lee panders to motorists and undermines SFMTA with Sunday metering repeal

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First Mayor Ed Lee ignores the rising cost of living in San Francisco (fueled partly by his own corporate welfare for the tech industry and commercial landlords), and now he’s using his sudden concern about gentrification as an excuse to make parking meters free again on Sundays, a blatant bit of political pandering that blows a $6 million annual Read more »

On the waterfront

Initiative would give voters a say on big waterfront projects that violate zoning standards

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steve@sfbg.com

Who should decide what gets built on San Francisco's waterfront: the people or the Mayor's Office and its political appointees? That's the question that has been raised by a series of high-profile development proposals that exceed current zoning restrictions, as well as by a new initiative campaign that has just begun gathering signatures.Read more »

Lies, damned lies, and statistics

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When is a public opinion poll a valid representation of how people feel? That turns out to be a tricky and ever-evolving question, particularly in San Francisco — thanks to its prevalence of tenants and technology — and even more particularly when it concerns the approval rating of Mayor Ed Lee.

Traditionally, the central requirements for public opinion polls to be considered valid is that respondents need to be representative of the larger population and they need to be selected at random. Polls are often skewed when people need to opt-in, as is the case in most online polls.Read more »