Steven T. Jones

The ick factor

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By Steven T. Jones
There are lots of icky aspects to Mayor Newsom's sex scandal, most not actually involving the sex which, lets face it, involved two hot young people. No, the icky parts deal with the betrayal of a close friend, the reckless disregard for his public responsibilities, and what it says about Newsom's character. Read more »

Smoove and Patricio bring the Love

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By Steven T. Jones
Someone has posted a video on You Tube of DJs Smoove and Patricio (two rocking local DJs who also happen to be good friends of mine) dropping the bass at the Anon Salon float at last year's Love Fest. Happy people, fun times, City Hall in the background...nice! Bonus points to readers who can find me in the clip.

Newsom's other Peter problem

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By Steven T. Jones
At the end of yesterday's sex scandal whirlwind, I finally got a chance to talk with Newsom press secretary Peter Ragone about the scandal that got pushed aside by the larger scandal: Ragone being caught using pseudonyms in online posts and then lying to cover it up. Read more »

Newsom's apology

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By Steven T. Jones
There were lots of different ways that Gavin Newsom could have reacted to news that he was having sex with an at-will employee who was also married to his close friend and top adviser, but almost all of them involved an apology. Here’s what he chose to say this morning, in its entirety, followed by why I think he has fallen short and sown the seeds for dragging out this scandal longer than necessary:

“Thank you for coming here on such short notice. Read more »

No joy

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By Steven T. Jones
Contrary to the demented hopes of conservative ideologues like the Examiner's Ken Garcia, there is no joy on the left over the sordid sex scandal that has now engulfed Mayor Gavin Newsom. Sure, it opens up this year's mayor's race and illustrates some of the character flaws of Newsom's administration, which have manifested themselves in how he conducts himself professionally, not just personally. Read more »

More fallout?

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By Steven T. Jones
Now comes word that Alex Tourk has resigned as the campaign manager for Newsom's reelection. For "personal reasons." Yeah right. Does this have something to do with Newsom standing by Ragone, again, just as he did when he let his old chief of staff Steve Kawa resign after a power struggle with Ragone? Or was it something that happened while Newsom was in the Swiss Alps? Read more »

Ragone comes clean? Not yet.

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By Steven T. Jones
According to KCBS radio, mayoral flack Peter Ragone has finally admitted to both posting on SFist and other blogs under a false name and lying to reporters about the existence of his imaginary friend, John Nelson. Newsom, who just returned from 10 days in Switzerland, reportedly expressed his displeasure with Ragone, but downplayed the incident.
Apparently, both men think that's the end of this, but it isn't. I had an appointment with Ragone scheduled for 4 p.m. Read more »

SockPuppetGate redux

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By Steven T. Jones
SFist has a nice wrap-up on the fallout from its outing of Newsom flack Peter Ragone as a liar, but the Chron's Matier & Ross not only buried the story halfway through today's column, they also missed the point. Read more »

Burning Man goes green

Local gearheads turned reluctant environmentalists?
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Burning Man founder Larry Harvey chooses the theme for each year's event — such as 2002's the Floating World and last year's Hope and Fear — but it usually doesn't have much impact on the basic character of the event. Read more »

The mystery of La Contessa

A galleon destroyed by fire. A priceless missing statue. Welcome to one of the great mysteries of the San Francisco underground.
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steve@sfbg.com

La Contessa was a Spanish galleon, amazingly authentic and true to 16th-century design standards in all but a couple respects. It was half the size of the ships that carried colonizers to this continent and pirates through the Caribbean. And it was built around a school bus, designed to trawl the Burning Man festival and the Black Rock Desert environs, where it became perhaps the most iconic and surreal art piece in the event's history.

The landcraft — perhaps like the sailing ships of yore — wasn't exactly easy to navigate. Read more »