Sean Hurd

'Pale kid' Watsky raps fast -- and returns to the Bay

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In 2007, then 20-year-old George Watsky and his band at the time, Invisible Inc., rented out Slim’s nightclub in San Francisco and put themselves on stage as the opening act. Sadly, Watsky spent years repaying back the loan that he lost on that show. 

Flash forward five years to the present, and on Sunday, July 29 the now 25-year-old under the stage name “Watsky” will be headlining a show at Slim’s, presented by Slim’s itself. Watsky’s performance in San Francisco is part of a 22-city national tour, which kicked off on July 1 in Tempe, Ariz. and wraps up July 31 in LA (including three shows in London, England after the national tour ends). Read more »

Tim Lincecum Bobble Head Day comes to AT&T Park. Giants fans get their Freak on.

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“They’re taking torture to a new level.”

Such were the words of Giants manager Bruce Bochy after his team's exhilarating 10th inning 2-1 walkoff win versus the visiting Houston Astros on Saturday night. Although it might not have been the best fielded game or the offensive show of force the Giants have been longing for, the team escaped with a win thanks to the bat of trade deadline acquisition Jeff Keppinger. 

But before the night’s climactic finish on the field, a different kind of celebration took place, just off it. It was Tim Lincecum Bobblehead Day at AT&T Park. Read more »

Giants fans and offense take a snooze at AT&T Park

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On yesterday’s clear and sunny Wednesday afternoon, the San Francisco Giants played in front of a sold-out crowd for their sixtieth straight home game in a row. 

But even the 42,000-plus fans in the bleachers couldn’t ignite the recently gone-limp bats of the 2010 world champs. The Giants lost the matinee by a lopsided score of 9-2 to the Pittsburgh Pirates, a team who before arriving in the Bay had lost 10 games in a row. 

There was no joy for Giants fans -- until the evening’s post-game special event, that is. Read more »

Beyond the stats: San Fran Preps and its crucial coverage

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“It’s decision time,” says Jeremy Balan, founder of San Fran Preps, a high school sports website that covers all thirty athletically competitive high schools in San Francisco.

He's not talking about a nail-biting second half of a soccer game. Unfortunately for Bay Area high school athletes and their supporters, his site needs help to keep up its coverage of prep athletics. Read more »

State of apprentice

CAREERS AND EDUCATION ISSUE: Gotta work for cheap? Scope out some of the Bay's best internships

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culture@sfbg.com

CAREERS AND ED In these transition times of underemployment, the internship has become the new entry level position in many industries. Sad but true. So listen up, future interns: look out for you. You're not benefiting much if all you're doing is unpaid paper pushing. Here is a list of internships that'll have you making memories while also helping you gain some great field experience.

 Read more »

Stop the presses?

CAREERS AND EDUCATION ISSUE: The evolving state of high school newspapers

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culture@sfbg.com

CAREERS AND ED It's hardly breaking news that the world of print journalism has been flipped on its head in recent years by the rise of the blogger and the trials and tribulations of paper publications. High school newsrooms have hardly been exempted from the medium's challenges. In fact, in many ways they're on the front lines. The pre-collegiate generation, after all, has grown up with itchy Google fingers.Read more »

Straightening out planking

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The newest international pastime involves lying face down on the ground with the ultimate goal of remaining as stiff as possible. I’d lump it in with parkour, mosh pits, and the car and phone booth stuffing competitions from the late 1950s and early ‘60s on account of its baffling physical appeal. For those of you unaware of this global craze and perhaps had no clue as to why Rosario Dawson was lying on a table on Jimmy Kimmel Live... they call it planking. Read more »

A skate day for creative community

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At last, a weekend with weather resembling an actual summer vacation. With Saturday's moderate temperature, a soothing breeze, and clear skies I was in a great mood to head to Tha Hood Games at the African American Art and Culture Complex (AAACC) on July 23 (click here to see our event preview). The vast majority of my experience with skateboarding has been watching the X Games religiously every year, so you could say that the bar was set high for day’s skating.

I didn't have a problem finding the Western Addition venue; all I had to do was follow the heart-pounding, bass-pumping beats coming from the event's speakers. Mistakingly anticipating a small crowd as I rounded the corner of Buchanan Street, it turned out the party had already started. A crowd stretched out in front of the AAACC for a lock down Fulton Street: skaters, parents, fans, everyone excited to check out the fun that was visible through the parking lot fence. Read more »

Grab your deck, Tha Hood Games riding out tomorrow Sat/23

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Mini ramps in front of murals, skate shoes stomping around, multiple forms of media sharing the spotlight for tomorrow (Sat/23)'s all-day multimedia art exhibit at the African Art and Culture Complex. Thanks to Parks and Recreation and an East Bay youth creativity non-profit you can shoulder your deck and head to Tha Hood Games exhibition.

Founded in East Oakland in 2005 by Keith "K-Dub" Williams & Ms. Barbara "Adjoa" Murden, Tha Hood Games was created to give “youth a creative platform to share their talents,” according to the group's website. Tha Hood Games has ramped up 30 skate events and youth art festivals all over the Bay Area, in Las Vegas, Long Beach, and at the X Games. Read more »

The Fillmore’s clip, cut, and snip: Reggie Pettus of New Chicago Barbershop No. 3 speaks

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35 years ago, if you were to step through the doors of New Chicago Barbershop No. 3 you’d probably find Reginald “Reggie” Pettus standing behind his classic barber’s chair. Today, Pettus can still be found in the shop on Fillmore Street, an area that has seen seismic changes in its community. Pettus and the shop are a part of the Fillmore’s African American past, but he wants people to know that the shop is part of the present, too.

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