Katie Kurtz

Vizzy with the possibilities

Fall Arts Preview: We scope out the promising shows
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KATIE KURTZ PICKS

"The Wizard of Oz" Not much has changed since L. Frank Baum's book The Wonderful Wizard of Oz debuted over a century ago and gave Americans something we still crave: escape to a fantastical land free of wicked witches. Read more »

"3"

Predatory birds, variously shaped atomic bomb clouds, lambs, and a wide-eyed man
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REVIEW For "3," artist Chris Duncan gathers a trio whose work explores pattern-making — either through the mark itself (Kyle Ranson's decorated figures and Derrick Snodgrass' prismatic constellations) or ordering select bits of visual information (Ernesto Burgos' wall collage).

Bay Area artist Snodgrass' Easter egg–colorful watercolors on paper from 2000 are refracted architectural shapes dotted with sunspots. Between then and now, Snodgrass loosened his grip and minimized his palette. Read more »

Code unknown

"Dark Matters: Artists See the Impossible" pictures black ops, hidden cops, and shadow streams of puzzling information
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The CIA maintains a number of "black sites" around the world where suspected terrorists are "disappeared." You can get a recipe for Irish Eyes Chicken Pot Pie or instructions on how to commit suicide on the Internet. Thousands of starlings spontaneously converge in a suburb in Rome where Benito Mussolini once planned on holding an exhibition celebrating Fascism. I love having dreams. There are more than 130 revolving restaurants around the world.

These are all interesting tidbits. But what do they mean? Read more »

Big bang

Artists embrace spirituality and their many selves at "Cosmic Wonder"
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REVIEW Near the end of "Song of Myself," Walt Whitman's woozy celebration of the universe contained within, he asks, "Do I contradict myself?" then responds to his own query, "Very well, then, I contradict myself." This is followed by the oft-cited parenthetical thought, "I am large — I contain multitudes," a sentiment that has been variously expressed in art since Whitman did so at the turn of the 20th century. Read more »