Holiday movie massacre! - Page 2

'Django Unchained,' 'Les Misérables,' and 10 more new flicks

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A pre-haircut Anne Hathaway in Les Misérables

Without giving anything away (no more than the film's suggestive title, anyway), once the survivors are established (and the film's strongest performer, Watts, is relegated to hospital-bed scenes) The Impossible finds its way inevitably to melodrama, and triumph-of-the-human-spirit theatrics. As the family's oldest son, 16-year-old Tom Holland is effective as a kid who reacts exactly right to crisis, morphing from sulky teen to thoughtful hero — but the film is too narrowly focused on its tourist characters, with native Thais mostly relegated to background action. It's a disconnect that's not quite offensive, but is still off-putting.

A disastrous movie to make you rethink procreation: A spin-off of sorts from 2007's Knocked Up, Judd Apatow's This is 40 (Fri/21) continues the story of two characters nobody cared about from that earlier film: Debbie (Leslie Mann, Apatow's wife) and Pete (Paul Rudd), plus their two kids (played by Mann and Apatow's kids). Pete and Debbie have accumulated all the trappings of comfortable Los Angeles livin': luxury cars, a huge house, a private personal trainer, the means to throw catered parties and take weekend trips to fancy hotels (and to whimsically decide to go gluten-free), and more Apple products than have ever before been shoehorned into a single film.

But! This was crap they got used to having before Pete's record label went into the shitter, and Debbie's dress-shop employee (Charlene Yi, another Knocked Up returnee who is one of two people of color in the film; the other is an Indian doctor who exists so Pete can mock his accent) started stealing thousands from the register. How will this couple and their whiny offspring deal with their financial reality? By arguing! About bullshit! In every scene! For nearly two and a half hours! By the time Melissa McCarthy, as a fellow parent, shows up to command the film's only satisfying scene — ripping Pete and Debbie a new one, which they sorely deserve — you're torn between cheering for her and wishing she'd never appeared. Seeing McCarthy go at it is a reminder that most comedies don't make you feel like stabbing yourself in the face. I'm honestly perplexed as to who this movie's audience is supposed to be. Self-loathing yuppies? Masochists? Apatow's immediate family, most of whom are already in the film?

For theater geeks only: By contrast, the audience Les Misérables (Tue/25) hopes to reel in is abundantly clear. There is a not-insignificant portion of the population who already knows all the words to all the songs of this musical-theater warhorse, around since the 1980s and honored here with a lavish production by Tom Hooper (2010's The King's Speech).

As other reviews have pointed out, this version only tangentially concerns Victor Hugo's French Revolution tale; its true raison d'être is swooning over the sight of its big-name cast crooning those famous tunes. Vocals were recorded live on-set, with microphones digitally removed in post-production — but despite this technical achievement, there's a certain inorganic quality to the proceedings. Like The King's Speech, the whole affair feels spliced together in the Oscar-creation lab. The hardworking Hugh Jackman deserves the nomination he'll inevitably get; jury's still out on Anne Hathaway's blubbery, "I cut my hair for real, I am so brave!" performance.

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