Man for the moment? - Page 3

John Rizzo's calm demeanor and steady progressivism may be the antidote to the sordid D5 supervisorial race

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John Rizzo speaks with D5 resident Maria Burluk as campaign worker Daniel Pope looks on.
Beth Laberge

"We are in such a mess in D5, and I'm hoping they will say, 'enough already, let's find someone who's just good on the issues, and that's John," Hansen said. “As a progressive, if you look at his stands over many years, I'd be hard-pressed to find an issue I don't agree with him on. He's a consistent, strong progressive voice, someone you can count on who's not aligned with some power base.”

Other prominent progressive leaders agree.

"What some people may have viewed as his weak point may end up being his strength," said former Board President Aaron Peskin, who endorsed Rizzo after the problems surfaced with Davis. "A calm, steady, cool, collected, dispassionate progressive may actually be the right thing for this moment."

Sup. Malia Cohen, a likable candidate who rose from fourth place on election night to win a heated District 10 supervisorial race two years ago, is a testament to how ranked-choice voting opens up lots of new possibilities.

"Ranked choice voting defies conventional wisdom," Peskin said. "There may be Julian Davis supporters and Christina Olague supporters and London Breed supporters who all place John Rizzo as their second."

In fact, during our endorsement interviews and in a number of debates and campaign events, nearly every candidate in the race mentioned Rizzo as a good second choice.

Yet Rizzo doesn't mince words when he talks about the need for reconstitute the progressive movement after the deceptions and big-money interests that brought Mayor Lee and "his fake age of civility" to power. Lee promised not to seek a full term "and he broke the deal," Rizzo said. "And it was a public deal he broke, not some backroom deal." 

That betrayal and the money-driven politics that Lee ushered in, combined with the divisive political climate that Lee's long effort to remove Mirkarimi from office created, has deeply damaged the city's political system. “I think the climate is very bad It's bad for progressives, and just bad for politics because it's turning voters off,” Rizzo said.

He wants to find ways to empower average San Franciscans and get them engaged with helping shape the city's future.

"We need a new strategy. We need to regroup and think about things long and hard. I think it's not working here. We're doing the same things and it's not working out. The money is winning." He doesn't think the answers lie in continued conflict, or with any individual politicians "because people are flawed, everyone is," Rizzo said.

Yet Rizzo's main flaw in the rough-and-tumble world of political campaigns may be that he's too nice, too reluctant to toot his horn or beat his chest. "That kind of style is not me. That aggressive person is not who I am," Rizzo said. "But I think voters like that. Voters do want someone who is going to focus on policy and not themselves."

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