Endorsements 2012: State and national races

End the death penalty -- Yes on 34. Go Barack, and vote No on 35 for sexworker justice

|
()

National races

PRESIDENT

BARACK OBAMA

You couldn't drive down Valencia Street on the evening of Nov. 4, 2008. You couldn't get through the intersection of 18th and Castro, either. All over the east side of the city, people celebrating the election of Barack Obama and the end of the Bush era launched improptu parties, dancing and singing in the streets, while the cops stood by, smiling. It was the only presidential election in modern history that create such an upwelling of joy on the American left — and while we were a bit more jaded and cautious about celebrating, it was hard not to feel a sense of hope.

That all started to change about a month after the inauguration, when word got out that the big insurance companies were invited to be at the table, discussing health-care reform — and the progressive consumer advocates were not. From that point on, it was clear that the "change" he promised wasn't going to be a fundamental shift in how power works in Washington.

Obama didn't even consider a single-payer option. He hasn't shut down Guantanamo Bay. He hasn't cut the Pentagon budget. He hasn't pulled the US out of the unwinnable mess in Afghanistan. He's been a huge disappointment on progressive tax and economic issues. It wasn't until late this summer, when he realized he was facing a major enthusiasm gap, that he even agreed to endorse same-sex marriage.

But it's easy to trash an incumbent president, particularly one who foolishly thought he could get bipartisan support for reforms and instead wound up with a hostile Republican Congress. The truth is, Obama has accomplished a fair amount, given the obstacles he faced. He got a health-care reform bill, weak and imperfect as it was, passed into law, something Democrats have tried and failed at since the era of FDR. The stimulus, weak and limited as it was, clearly prevented the recession from becoming another great depression. His two Supreme Court appointments have been excellent.

And the guy he's running against is a disaster on the scale of G.W. Bush.

Mitt Romney can't even tell the truth about himself. He's proven to be such a creature of the far-right wing of the Republican Party that it's an embarrassment. A moderate Republican former governor of Massachusetts could have made a credible run for the White House — but Romney has essentially disavowed everything decent that he did in his last elective office, has said one dumb thing after another, and would be on track to be one of the worse presidents in history.

We get it: Obama let us down. But there's a real choice here, and it's an easy one. We'll happily give a shout out to Jill Stein, the candidate of the Green Party, who is talking the way the Democrats ought to be talking, about a Green New Deal that recognizes that the richest nation in the history of the world can and should be doing radically better on employment, health care, the environment, and economic justice. And since Obama's going to win California by a sizable majority anyway, a protest vote for Stein probably won't do any harm.

But the next four years will be a critical time for the nation, and Obama is at least pushing in the direction of reality, sanity and hope. We endorsed him with enthusiasm four year ago; we're endorsing him with clear-eyed reality in 2012.

Related articles

  • East Bay Endorsements 2012

    Our recommendations in key Alameda County, Berkeley and Oakland races

  • Endorsements 2012: San Francisco propositions

    Yes (sigh) on Prop B. And vote hell yes to deny corporations personhood -- that'd be Prop G

  • Endorsements 2012: San Francisco races

    Rizzo and Selby for D5 supervisor. Our top choice in D1 is Eric Mar