Maverick

The seven-year-old favorite's New Southern cuisine improves with age (and a new chef).

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Maverick's crispy fried chicken is as juicy on the inside as ever.
GUARDIAN PHOTO BY VIRGINIA MILLER

virginia@sfbg.com

APPETITE Opened on July 13 way back in 2005, Maverick is a longtimer by modern day restaurant standards. I'd posit that it's better than ever with new executive chef Emmanual Eng, brought on last year by owners Scott Youkilis and Michael Pierce (who is also the general manager and wine director). In contrast to its more casual, younger sister Hog and Rocks, Maverick's food has grown more sophisticated and focused over the years.

The menu delights and has evolved slightly at each visit, with whispers of Southern influence (and beyond) married to forward-thinking culinary vision. Traditional Southern ingredients and dishes are a springboard for cutting-edge "New Southern" cuisine, the likes of which I've seen in cities such as Charleston and Atlanta in recent years or at San Francisco newcomers like Dixie and St. Vincent.

Maverick hasn't slowed down with age and, especially with talented young Chef Eng on board, to continue challenging itself. An artist and Portland native, Eng boldly walked into SF's Indigo in 2000, offering to work for free to learn the ropes. He eventually became line cook at Aqua, Quince, and Foreign Cinema, then sous chef at Boulevard and Sons and Daughters. His experience at some of our top restaurants shows in his bold-yet-refined cooking.

Let's get the obvious out of the way: the signature fried chicken ($24) is as fantastic as ever. Juicy inside, crispy outside, and not at all greasy, the batter is touched with cinnamon, cayenne, and white pepper. It was recently served with blackened patty-pan squash, succotash, pickled watermelon rind, and cornbread croutons — with ham hock and mustard gravy tying it all together, eliciting sighs of delight. It's hard not to want to return to this one over and over again — and many diners do.

But you'd be remiss not to branch out. There's nothing Southern about a squash blossom stuffed with brandade ($10), rosso bruno tomatoes, Calabrian chilis, and basil, but it's delicious. Italian spirit is also present in burrata cheese, made nearby on 16th Street ($12), but rather than being leaving it as another burrata starter, Eng layers flavors with ashed rind from corn husks, baby leeks, arugula pisto, pickled fiddlehead ferns and zucchini. Just before the foie gras ban — which I am not happy about — a duck butcher plate ($16) impressed with foie, tasso-cured duck breast (there's your Southern touch: fantastic tasso ham), strawberry mostarda, white peach, lime, and duck rillette croquette. Summery as it was rich, it's the mostarda I craved more of.

Another inspired Southern reinterpretation is porcini mushroom and Anson Mills grits ($12.50). It's not remotely a traditional grits dish, in fact, there's only a smattering of creamy grits amid tender porcinis, pearl onion, snap peas and a smoked soft-poached egg running over ingredients when punctured. For a vegetarian dish, it's almost meaty and soulful. Massachusetts Dayboat sea scallops ($13) are seared just right, but accents of compressed watermelon, pineapple mint, Padron peppers, dotted with lipstick pimento sauce and ancho chile-pumpkin seed pesto making it memorable. Lobster bread pudding draped in smoked cod ($26) is a brilliant twist on traditional New Brunswick stew — in this case, a creamy mussel chowder touched with jerky-like strips of linguica, clams, corn, and sea beans (seaweed). Dessert is no afterthought. In fact, a chocolate Samoa truffle ($9) feels like vacation, a chocolate mound spiked with chocolate bark in a pool of caramelized coconut accented by crumbled shortbread.

Comments

$24 for fried chicken. their is a sucker born every minute as the old saying goes. someone is making a great profit.

Posted by ron on Aug. 01, 2012 @ 8:34 am

Yep, just bags of money to be made owning a restaurant.

I'm sure you'll be opening yours soon to take advantage of this get rich quick scheme.

Posted by Guest on Aug. 05, 2012 @ 3:32 pm

Hey Ron - maybe you should go back to your 20 piece bucket o' wings from KFC. Looks like you're not grown up enough to eat adult food.

Posted by Guest on Sep. 11, 2012 @ 4:12 pm

It's "there is" not "their". You used the wrong form.

Posted by Guest on Oct. 18, 2012 @ 8:02 am

I love how in this city people equate paying outrageous prices for food as for adults or sophisticated as if somehow a barometer of good taste, like the 12.00 martini, and the overpriced food in this city that is bought by the Obama sheeple, sycophantic, zombie, liberal, lunatics, that care more about their looks, Facebook, Twitter, and looking as if they really don't care about what they wear while spending insane time buying and spending vast money on these thrift store type clothes at expensive boutiques in Hayes valley. These people won't, can't or are too lazy to cook. I grew up in L.A. my brothers and sisters would go to Shakey's Pizza buffet, yes the food was not quite gourmet, but then we were not isane like poeople today, we did not think we deserved the best food every night or twice a week at crazy prices that could pay someones rent in Fresno, these people that own these just too cool restaurants are greedy and taking advantage of these suckers that go there. Shakey's where we got pizza, chicken, spaghetti, meatballs, garlic bread, soda. milk, tea, ice cream, pudding, and more. We were kids, and adults, and we had fun and we spent little, we had more fun that sitting with a bunch of fucking tools.

Where did this idea that it was cool to go out and eat expensive food? It was meant for special occasions not a lifestyle. SF full of fake and ignorant wannabee's.
Best times when you cook for your girlfriend, basic meals, roast chicken, an average steak, soup, chili, why does everything now have to be going out, buying a bottle of wine, and eating trendy chic food. This is why SF is now a crap city.

Posted by Guest on Mar. 04, 2013 @ 4:31 am

money than you have, then why don't you move somewhere more cheap, gritty and working class like, say, Fresno?

Posted by anon on Mar. 04, 2013 @ 7:01 am

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