Under oath - Page 2

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Mayor Ed Lee testifies in front of the Ethics Commission shortly before being whisked away by his security detail.

Kopp specifically asked whether that job offer had been extended on Lee's behalf by permit expediter Walter Wong or by San Francisco Democratic Party Chair Aaron Peskin, to which Lee replied, "Absolutely not."

Mirkarimi supporters have told the Guardian that Peskin had made that offer, which Mirkarimi refused, shortly before the party chair publicly called for Mirkarimi's resignation. The outgoing message on Peskin's cell phone said he was unavailable and wouldn't be checking his messages until July 5. Mirkarimi's attorneys said they're still figuring out how to respond to the developments and had no comment, but Walker said she's willing to testify under oath.

But the dramas underscore the treacherous grounds opened up by these unprecedented proceedings, the first involving the Ethics Commission and the broadened definition of official misconduct placed into the City Charter in 1996. As baseball great Barry Bonds and former President Bill Clinton learned, being forced to testify under oath about sensitive topics can be a tough trap to negotiate.

 

MIRKARIMI TESTIMONY

Deputy City Attorney Peter Keith also seemed to be trying to spring that perjury trap on Mirkarimi as he took the stand on the morning of June 29 following an hour on the stand at the previous night's hearing. Keith reminded Mirkarimi that he was advised not to discuss his testimony with anyone and asked, "Who have you spoken to since last night?"

"My attorneys," Mirkarimi answered.

"What did you say to them?" Keith asked, drawing objections about attorney-client privilege that Commission Chair Benedict Hur sustained.

"Did you stop for coffee?" Keith then asked, seemingly concerned that Mirkarimi may have discussed his testimony with someone at the coffee shop that morning, which Mirkarimi denied. Keith let the allegation go but maintained an accusatory, hectoring tone throughout the next three hours that he had Mirkarimi on the stand, two more hours than he had told the commission he would need.

Much of the time was spent trying to establish support for the allegation that Mirkarimi had dissuaded witnesses and sought to thwart the police investigation, which was triggered by a call from Ivory Madison, a neighbor to whom Mirkarimi's wife, Eliana Lopez, had confided. But the testimony yielded little more than the city's unsupported inference that Mirkarimi must have directed Lopez and his campaign manager, Linnette Peralta Haynes, to contact Madison after she had called the police and urged her to stop cooperating with them.

Mirkarimi has maintained that he did nothing to dissuade Madison or anyone from talking to police, and that he wasn't aware of the investigation or that Madison had made a videotape of Lopez showing a bruise on her arm until hours after the police were involved. He even sent a text to Lopez saying there was nothing he could do, as he noted.

"It was after 4pm on January 4 when I first learned of any of this," Mirkarimi testified, later adding, "I was very clear to her in saying you can't unring the bell, we have to follow through with this."

Yet Lee and the deputy city attorneys who are representing him also maintain that they needn't prove witness dissuasion or other allegations they have made, and that the Dec. 31 incident and Mirkarimi's guilty plea to a single misdemeanor count of false imprisonment are enough to constitute official misconduct and warrant his removal, an interpretation that Mirkarimi's attorneys dispute.

Keith sought to hammer home how Mirkarimi should have admitted to and publicly atoned for his crime right away rather than telling reporters it was a "private family matters" (which Mirkarimi admitted was a mistake) or fighting the charges by trying to discredit Madison publicly, an allegation he denies.

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