What are people? - Page 3

Occupy protesters and progressive politicians call for end to corporate personhood

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Occupy activists stand in front of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals to demand and end to corporate personhood
GUARDIAN PHOTO BY LUKE THOMAS

The hurdles set forth to amend the U.S. Constitution, outlined in Article V, are substantial. In order for an amendment to even be considered, a super majority of both houses of Congress must initiate the process, or two-thirds of states must call for the amendment. Proposed amendments passing this threshold are then adopted only after three-quarters of state legislatures ratify the proposed amendment. But that difficult road is one the protesters said they are ready to travel. "We are here on a rainy day with warm hearts and wet feet. We are the 100 percent, the humans. No corporation has every experienced the thrill of wet feet," said Gangs of America author Ted Nace. "We are the fools who go out on a wet day to fix a broken world. Eighty percent of the public want to fix this. That means we are halfway to our goal. What remains is organization, mobilization."

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