Cream of the crop

Appetite goes down on the farm for a delicious visit to the Straus Family and Cowgirl Creameries

|
(0)
Young Eve at the Straus family farm
GUARDIAN PHOTO BY VIRGINIA MILLER

virginia@sfbg.com

APPETITE On a recent misty morning in Point Reyes, and then during a Petaluma afternoon inland, I visited two of our most beloved creameries. The damp earth of a dairy farm in dark, early hours is oddly intoxicating, while sampling fresh cheese in various stages of ripening is sheer pleasure. These dairies make me proud of the familial, forward-thinking, humane food practices that have been going strong in the Bay Area for decades.

 

STRAUS FAMILY CREAMERY

One look in the eyes of cows at Straus Family Creamery (www.strausfamilycreamery.com) and you're changed. If you did not care where your milk came from, you do now. Petting baby cows, tagged with names such as Wilma or Eve, you become attached, even protective, of these peaceable animals.

Organic before it became a "trend," Bill Straus began farming this coastal Point Reyes land in 1941 with 23 cows (there are now over 300 milk cows). His wife Ellen read Rachel Carson's game-changing Silent Spring in the 1960s, mobilizing them both toward a lifelong commitment to environmental sustainability. Theirs were the first certified organic dairy farm west of the Mississippi in 1994, leading in sustainable farming practices.

Early on a soft, gray weekday, I trekked up to the farm, right on Tomales Bay, via scenic winding roads. The air smells funky with cows, yes, but also bracingly of earth, water, grass.

Bill and Ellen's son Albert Straus now runs the farm. Majoring in dairy science, he launched the famed ice cream line (he's a real aficionado), continuing to grow Straus Creamery in sustainable practices like composting solids and waste to fertilize their land (or that of nearby biodynamic wineries).

Straus keeps a "closed herd" so no infection or disease gets transported to the cows. While he works with 300 milking cows, he's simultaneously raising 250 young cows who begin milking after two years.

As prices of basics like grain and production have gone up at least 25 percent in the last couple of years, there's not a lot of profit to made allowing the natural process vs. increasing milk flow by injecting cows with hormones. It is heartening to see those like Straus, who care more about the quality and health of the product for consumers, along with the animals and their land, than the bottom line. Still, Straus presses on, under standards for organic farm certification that are stricter than for any food product.

"Most farmers are pretty risk averse, but I seem to continue to go the other way, "Albert told me with a laugh.

He's pleased to note that around 50 percent of Marin and Sonoma farms are now organic. (Learn more about the organization formed in part by Albert and Sue Conley of Cowgirl Creamery, Marin Organic, www.marinorganic.org, now celebrating 10 years and responsible for promoting much of the region and industry's growth).

 

COWGIRL CREAMERY

A day spent with Cowgirl Creamery (www.cowgirlcreamery.com) founders Sue Conley and Peggy Smith, among the finest cheesemakers in the country, is a delight. There are close ties to the Straus family: Conley and Smith not only source milk from Straus, but Sue was in part inspired to launch Cowgirl by the Strauses.

Both from rich culinary backgrounds, Peg and Sue created highly-lauded cheeses like that triple-cream dream, Mt. Tam, and earthy, unique Red Hawk. Their shop in the Ferry Building is a cheese destination.

Related articles

  • Our 50 favorite San Francisco bars -- all on one page!

  • The G50: San Francisco's top bars

    From splashy dives to upscale classics (and everything in between) — our favorite spots to grab a drink

  • Fresh sips

    Cocktail, food on the side: What to eat when you're sipping around town

  • Also from this author

  • Our 50 favorite San Francisco bars -- all on one page!

  • The G50: San Francisco's top bars

    From splashy dives to upscale classics (and everything in between) — our favorite spots to grab a drink

  • Fresh sips

    Cocktail, food on the side: What to eat when you're sipping around town