Sunny side of the scream

In a world of disappearing all-female bands, the Bay Area's Erase Errata turn in their strongest recording to date
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kimberly@sfbg.com
The Greek deities might throw lightning bolts and issue stormy protests, but when I first saw Erase Errata in November 2001, they seemed less a fledgling local all-girl band than scruffy goddesses sprung full grown from the temple of ... Mark E. Smith. The year-and-a-half-old foursome opened for the newly reenergized, near-surfabilly Fall and they were staggering — seeming grrrlish prodigies who picked up the sharp, jagged tools discarded by Smith with a confidence that seemed Olympian (as in Washington State and Zeus's heavenly homestead). On their way to All Tomorrow's Parties in LA, vocalist–trumpet player Jenny Hoyston, guitarist Sara Jaffe, bassist Ellie Erickson, and drummer Bianca Sparta were poised to speak in primal feminist riddles while constructing their own dissonant wing to the Fall's aural complex, one comprising driving, weirdo time signatures; raw, textural guitar; and atonal washes.
It was not the type of performance you might expect from Hoyston, 32, who grew up stranded in a singular God's country in the "dry," extremely Christian, and very un–rock ’n' roll town of Freeport, Texas, where she was once more likely to be Bible thumping instead of guitar thrumming. "I was a born-again Christian, Republican. I was engaged," says Hoyston today, gazing out on the concrete beer garden of el Rio where she regularly does sound and books shows. "I thought my life had to be this one way."
So what turned her toward the path of big-daddy demon rock?
"Uh, LSD," she says drily.
Actually it was the empty feeling that engulfed her despite all the church-related activities she threw herself into — that and the life-changing spectacle of SF dyke punk unit Tribe 8 playing her college town of Lansing, Mich. "I was just really impressed by how free those crazy people seemed. It just seemed really beautiful," she explains. "And I didn't necessarily come out here to meet them and hang out with them. Straight-up punk is not really my kind of music. But I think they are just so powerful. They came to town and made all the queers feel like they were going to go to this place, maybe even with their boyfriend and hold their hands and not get beat up. I wanted to get that empowered."
There are still more than a few remnants of that sweet, shy Texas back-roads girl that Hoyston once was: She speaks gently and looks completely nondescript in her black T-shirt and specs, padding around el Rio as the petal-soft air of an SF summer afternoon burns into the deep velvet pelt of night. Some might mistake her watchful awkwardness for holier- or hipper-than-thou aloofness. But here at her dive, waiting for Tank Attack and Fox Pause to materialize for the first Wednesday show she books, she's in her element, playing Bee Gees tracks and disco hits between the bands, running the PA, and busying herself by distributing flyers for an upcoming Pam Grier movie night.
"I'm excited about tonight's show because it's not a big heavy-drinking crowd," Hoyston offers sincerely.
Erase Errata's vocalist and now guitarist is far from an archetypal star, even as her band has become more than a little well-known in indie, underground, and experimental music circles. The seniors in a small smart class of all-female groups in the Bay Area — including conceptual metal-noise supergroup T.I.T.S. and experimental noise Midwestern transplants 16 Bitch Pileup — they share with those bands an embrace of threatening, cacophonous sonics and edge-rockin', artful yet intuitive tendencies that inevitably meet the approval of those persnickety noise boys, an approach Hoyston is now fully conscious of.
"I think had our music been slightly less confrontational, we would have been dismissed a lot quicker," she says. "I think people thought we had cred because we were being hard, y'know."
Weasel Walter — who first lived in Hoyston's former Club Hott warehouse in Oakland upon moving from Chicago — can validate that perspective.

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